Astra Lost in Space – 12 (Fin) – Lost No Longer

We’re blessed with a double-length Astra finale, which really gives the show time and space to breathe and finish telling the story it’s apparent it always wanted to tell, and more importantly treated a loyal audience to a proper sendoff of the characters we’ve gradually come to love—and who have grown to love one another—one by one.

The first half, itself the length of a normal episode, is devoted to the return trip home. With Charce’s suicide plan foiled and Kanata down an arm but otherwise fine, the work of restocking the ship for the journey back to Astra. Kanata has to rest while the others work outside, but Aries quells his loneliness and FOMO by keeping him company.

Once they’re off Planet Galem, there’s ample time for the crew to assemble and hear Charce’s story of the history of their world—the real history, corroborating and continuing the story begun by Polina. Turns out the plan to relocate humanity’s population was so fraught with conflict, half of that population was killed in bitter wars for land on the new planet before the migration even took place.

The survivors of the conflict vowed never to let anything like that occur again, and so abolished nations and religions on Astra. Furthermore, the first generation to move and live there was the last to know about the true history of Earth; an alternate history of WWIII was fabricated, and the very timeline of humanity turned back 100 years.

All this time, the crew thought they were living in the year 2063, when it has actually been 2163; over one hundred years since the migration was successfully completed. It also means Polina wasn’t asleep for twelve years, but one hundred and twelve—yet doesn’t look a day over 29!

The crew decides that the world can’t go on living with a false history, but understands that telling the world the wrong way could be disastrous, not just to them but to the world.

Ulgar suggests they contact a trustworthy police lieutenant, and an detailed message is sent to him through Aries’ mom, including photos and videos of the still very much alive crew of Camp B5 and the log Aries has been making throughout the show (a nice touch).

By the time the Astra reaches orbit of Planet Astra, Lt. Grace is already at work arresting the King of Vixia, as well as his successor for his role in Princess Seira’s murder. Nothing a cop likes more than a bonanza of hard evidence. Very satisfying to watch these jerk-ass crooks made to pay for their heinous crimes.

The kids are met by an armed fleet in orbit, but after a few tense moments, contact is made and they identify themselves as friendly escorts, reporting that their originals have been apprehended and they are free to land. This is one of those instances where the extra length really counts, as we get to savor the crew’s arrival home and their ship’s final landing.

Once they arrive, and they get to tell their story to every media outlet on the planet, the crew become instant celebrities. Kanata and Charce tell the higher authorities about the need to spread the truth, something the higher-ups ultimately go with.

That bitter pill of truth is washed down without excessive unrest due in no small part to the charm of the crew, including the humanizing memoir about their five-month odyssey written by Kanata…not to mention the modelling chops of Quitterie and King Charce.

The length of the episode not only means it gets to take its time with a happy ending, but jumps seven years into the future, when the bulk of the crew is now 24. Everyone has changed their look a bit, but remain themselves and more importantly, remain good friends with one another, as you’d expect from what they went through. Yunhua sings a song inspired by those experiences, which essentially plays the series out.

Quitterie is married to Zack, while Funi is in high school and looks just like Quitterie (and has Polina as a teacher). Ulgar is now a serious journalist, while Kanata has achieved his goal of becoming a captain in seven years. His new ship is his old ship; buying the over 100-year-old Astra with funds earned from his book and fame.

With his past and present trusty mates Zack and Charce, they take off to chart the exit points of the wormholes and beyond, but they’ll be back. After all, Charce has kingly duties to get back to; Zack has a wife to get back to, and Kanata has to get back to Aries so they can marry and have a daughter they can name Seira.

And there you have it: Kanata no Astra, not just an epic survival story of a group of extraordinary kids, but herald to a bold new truth for humanity. One could say almost too much befell these kids; that they’re too special. But to that I say…what do you expect? They are, after all, the clones of people rich and powerful and ambitious enough to, well, clone themselves.

They were always destined for greatness, but it wasn’t going to be given to them; they were literally left for dead. But their originals made one critical blunder, forgetting about the presence of one last ship in old Earth’s orbit, the chariot of their downfall and their clones’ salvation. In the end, the clones surpassed their originals to become entirely different people—better people.

People who, rather than lying and cheating and stealing their way through life, scratched and tore and screamed to break the bonds of their origins, united together in love and fellowship, and changed the goddamned world. Hell of a story if you ask me.

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Astra Lost in Space – 11 – Right Hand Man

In the biggest twist yet in a show packed with ’em, Charce turns out to be the clone of the king, raised to be a replacement body, not an individual person. When clones were banned, his mission changed: accompany the Space Camp and ensure they all die.

And yet, even having heard all this, Kanata isn’t ready to give up on Charce. He insists that if he really didn’t love and care about them, he wouldn’t have hesitated with the wormhole generator. But Charce has an exploration for that too: Aries Spring is the clone of the king’s only daughter, Princess Seira.

Seira was staunchly against being cloned, but her father did it anyway, cementing the king as a violating dickwad concerned only with everlasting life. She spirited her baby clone away with her surrogate mother, Emma, naming her the reverse of her name before parting.

A year before Space Camp, Seira and Charce were enjoying nature when a shadowy figure rushed out of the woods and shoved Seira off a cliff; an assassination made to look like an accident. The king threw Charce in jail where he rotted until a week before camp, when he was assigned his new mission: to die, and take the other illegal clones with him.

It’s fair to say Charce had the most fucked up childhood of the crew, and what makes him even more pitiable is that he believes his life has been wonderful, as long as he’s had a purpose; as long as he served his king. Kanata gives him a much needed punch; he can talk about his true purpose all day; he knows when someone is forcing or faking happiness, and Charce hasn’t been faking it.

But Charce’s mind seems made up; he produces a second wormhole generator from the right arm of his suit—a wormhole meant only for him. This isn’t about fulfilling a mission anymore, but punishing himself for betraying the only friends he had in the world (other than Seira).

Kanata stops the suicide attempt with another one of his athletic feats, jumping over the dang wormhole and shielding Charce from it. But he misjudged the distance, and Charce can’t turn off the wormhole soon enough. It swallows Kanata’s right arm, transporting it back to Earth orbit.

The moment Kanata’s arm disappears, the most pressing question is whether he’ll survive the injury. Quitterie doubtlessly saves a lot of his precious blood with her quick thinking and first aid, but he needs a hospital, and they’re still far from Astra. Charce regrets what happened, and Kanata tells him he’ll pay for it by being his second-in-command when he gets a ship. But right now, in Kanata’s present state, it sounds an awful lot like a death flag.

Astra Lost in Space – 10 – Snowball’s Charce in Hell

Polina knows something’s up when the blue planet on the screen isn’t Earth, and that none of the kids know what “Earth” even is, because their home planet is Astra. Kanata jokes that Polina might be an alien, but he and the crew decide it best to compare histories.

That’s when they learn where their two histories diverged: in Polina’s, 1962 was the year of the Cuban Missile Crisis; in the crew’s, that crisis precipitated World War III, which resulted in half of humanity perishing. When it was over, countries and weapons were abolished, and a united planet rebuilt.

That brings us back to Polina’s history: there never was a World War III, but a little while before embarking on the journey that would strand her on Icriss, astronomers detected a 300-kilometer asteroid on a collision course with earth. That necessitated humanity packing up and migrating to a new world.

When Polina was on her mission aboard the Ark VI, they were still looking for planets, but six years before the present—and five years after she went into hibernation—the asteroid must have struck. By then, humanity had managed to successfully migrate…to Astra. The next generation, of which the Astra’s crew is composed, were told a vague alternate history and raised not to dwell on the past.

How, you ask, did they manage to move so many people? Why, with miniature artificial wormholes (duh), the very phenomenon that sucked up the crew in McPa and dropped them in orbit of an icy planet…a planet that turned out to be Earth itself, having gone into an ice age after the asteroid impact.

Now that they know the basic how of their predicament, Aries suggests the crew not dwell on the why, lest it bring down morale at a crucial time. Life returns to normal for the duration of the trip to the final planet, Galem. When they land on the planet to resupply one last time, Polina is duly impressed by the efficiency and know-how the crew demonstrates—this is not their first planet rodeo, after all.

Kanata and Aries reflect on everything that’s happened and how they’ve become stronger people during this whole adventure, no matter what the goal of the enemy was. Kanata also asks if he can walk Aries home to reunite with her mom; Aries accepts the offer. Maybe there’s hope for this couple after all, eh?

But while off on his own on Galem’s surface, a wormhole appears and starts chasing Kanata, who ends up finding refuge in a cave where Aries is gathering supplies. Later, Kanata confides in us, the audience, by stating he knows who the enemy is now, that the enemy doesn’t know he knows, and that he intends to make the first move before they can kill them all.

Kanata meets secretly with Charce and Zack and informs them that Ulgar is the enemy, and outlines the plan to entrap and capture him, with Charce serving as the bait. But when the plan of action is executed, Charce is alone with Ulgar, Ulgar pulls his gun but it misfires, and the wormhole is activated, it’s not Ulgar who Kanata takes down…it’s Charce.

Charce is the one who controls the wormholes. Charce is the one whose mission was, and is, to kill all the others….along with himself. It’s a thrilling, brilliant set piece of misdirection, and some impressive cunning on Kanata’s part.

The entire crew except Charce was in on the plan, and they are there when Charce is captured. A tearful Aries wants him to tell them that they’re, that she’s mistaken; earlier in the ep Kanata meets with Aries in her quarters, but he wasn’t there to confess. He wanted to know, in detail only Aries’ photographic memory could provide, who was sucked into the wormhole last. It was Charce, ensuring everyone else went in before him.

While his mission was to transport himself and everyone else from McPa to space to die, he didn’t count on everyone getting their helmets on in time to survive the transition, nor the pure dumb luck of the Astra, formerly the Ark XII, being in orbit so close to where they materialized.

As for who he really is, well, Charce is a clone too, but has always known he’s a clone…and not a clone of just anyone, but of Noah Vix, king of the Vixia Royal Quarter. Of course there could only be one king. One wonders if his friend Seira was a factor in his agreeing to complete this mission, and also make me wonder if, considering their resemblance, arieS is Seira’s clone.

Not only that, but what will happen now that his mission has failed, and the clones are returning to Astra? Not that things were ever not interesting on this show, but things are really starting to more interesting. And to think I initially thought this was a show that would kill its characters off one-by-one on a weekly basis…

Space Patrol Luluco – 13 (fin)

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Not to be outdone by the second to last episode, Luluco’s finale pulls a surprisingly emotional twist before unleashing the series’ best animated fight scene.

Nova is almost immediately destroyed by a micro-blackhole that the Blackholien planted in his head, just in case of emergencies. And while Luluco ultimately gets to say good bye towards the end of the fight, and they both commit to seeing each other again, some day, in some dimension, The immediate emotional damage to Luluco is handled very. Extra credit well for such a goofey 7 minute format show.

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As is always the case, the episodes visuals are packed with meaning. The bullet Luluco and Nova fire when combined is wrapped with the film strips of their memories together, for example.

Another side detail that caught my attention was Luluco’s father, who encourages Luluco to ‘hunt Nova down to the ends of the universe and arrest him again’ because that’s what he’d do… and probably did over Lalaco.

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After Blackholien is defeated, episode 13 treats us to an Epilog: Midori is promoted to Chief, the Chief is promoted to commander in chief, Luluco’s dad is off chasing Lalaco, and Luluco has become ‘Lady Trigger’ a special dimension hopping space patrol agent who’s riding an upside down gun motorcycle.

It’s a neat and tidy wrap up for the show and pleasantly ambiguous about time and greater purpose. Luluco looks older (or sexied up at least) and even though she has a greater quest, the caveat that she can hop dimensions (and is now the Trigger of the universe), she could just as likely become a new mascot for Trigger, as get a sequel.

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Verdict: Space Patrol Luluco had some wonderful highs, often relying on a batshit crazy mix of heart warming music, innocent emotions, incomprehensible action and inside brand-jokes. It also lagged a bit in the middle and, despite the thrill of the best 7 minute segments, there was very little room to build rounded characters and a strong attachment.

At the end of the day, Luluco lives in the shadow of Kill La Kill, FLCL, and TTGL. Absolutely worth your time, possibly an interesting extension of its studio’s brand, but its devotion to the absurd and packed micro episodes holds it back from developing the lived in world — a mad world many viewers would fantasize living in — presented by the greats.

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Space Patrol Luluco – 12

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Nearing the finale, Luluco wastes no time reassembling its cast and bringing out the mega showdown: Lalaco immediately shows up to bail everyone out of jail, re-unites Luluco’s father’s body and brain, and allows Luluco to ‘doc’ with the pirate ship.

Then an over the top space battle ensues and it’s wonderful.

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Nova being empty and Luluco’s love not being fulfilled is the second bit of tidying up we get and it too is as over the top as ever. Luluco literally fills Nova up with her ‘stupid middle school love’ until he can finally feal emotions. His heart blossoms, creating it’s own blue love jem, which combines with Luluco’s to create ‘true mutual first love,’ the most poerful in the universe.

Thus united, the two stand off against Blackholien for the final final show down.

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Verdict: the amount of detail, texture and novelty packed into this episode’s visuals is mind bending. It works well, but there’s so much you can digest, you may feel the urge to rewatch it a few times without subtitles, and to pause a few frames for closer inspection.

In fact, that shiny flashy constant distraction benefits the plot overall, because the plot itself is an eye-rollingly simple affair of Girl Meets Boy, Love wins the Day. This is far from a criticism, obviously. Simple can be wondrous when the visuals and timing are this masterfully crafted.

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Space Patrol Luluco – 11

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Dead Luluco comes into being in a Hell-scape version of Ogikubo, where she’s alone until another Flaming Skull space patrol officer welcomes to eat fake crab meat skewers by the fire.

They chat about her predicament and, eventually, the immortality of the intangible. The skull guy says he’s died many times but has always come back for justice. Realizing that Nova never actually lied to her, Luluco regains heart and decides she has to confess (and arrest) Nova before it’s her time.

Then she returns and demolishes her own funeral. Roll credits…

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Verdict: while this was a bit predictable, get the hero back on her feet story, it was handled with Space Patrol’s typical flair for the bizarre. The flaming Skull guy goes totally unexplained and his ‘eating’ animation is made so blatantly nonexistent that it reads as a joke.

If the line “I’m going to confess to him. Then I’m going to arrest him for shoplifting my love.” gives you a smile, all the rest is just gravy.

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Space Patrol Luluco – 10

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Luluco is in bliss: she’s finally found Ogakubo, she’s being rewarded by Space Patrol Central HQ, and Nova seems as warm as he always is… right until he reaches into her chest and removes the crystal that’s been growing there and she dies.

It was all a trap by the Blackholeians, who are considered the source of all evil in the universe. They’ve taken over HQ… for reasons not entirely clear except that, at the height of any civilization’s technological discovery, a place like Ogakubo is created as an ideal cultural hub.

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The hub itself is worthless, except it has a chance to foster a normal girl who’s first love is perfect. Perfect, in that it is the most worthless thing in the universe, and worthlessness is the most valuable thing to the Blackholeians.

“The first love of a stupid middle schooler is a boy who’s nothing but his looks. This is the pinnacle of worthlessness!”

All of this is explained to Midori via print outs and exposition. The chief is there, but Midori is really the only character interested or, at least, antagonistic to the antagonist. Then everyone is locked in a cell and they hold a funeral for Luluco.

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Verdict: it was hilarious watching a villain flat out say all youth romance is crap, and give a ton of visual examples of why it produces nothing of value. It was also a great development to reveal Nova is not evil or good, just purely empty of everything.

There were good visuals, an interesting narrative turn, and the narrative was funny by poking fun at the characters and at life and conventions of story telling too. Solid solid and only falls short due to a lack of action… which wouldn’t have been possible within the play length of a single short format episode.

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Space Patrol Luluco – 09

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Luluco visists a private investigator on a limited color pallet planet. She’s half heartedly asking about Ogikubo but really, she’s there to away from Nova. She can’t decide if he like her or not?

Luluco doesn’t have much time to ponder, because the PI office is abruptly attacked by a mob boss and a car chase/mass brawl ensues. In the end, Nova comes to rescue her and take her to the real Ogikubo.

Roll credits…

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This was, by far, the worst episode of Space Patrol to date. I have no idea what show was being referenced and, even if I did, the whole battle between the Don and the PI was so truncated that there was no time to build any sort of connection with anyone. It was just weird and epileptic action.

It could actually have worked as a manga — the styling is pretty cool and some of the snarky humor would have had room to breath — but it really doesn’t work as an animation. It’s too hard to follow and not enough is actually going on, even if you pause the action and inspect everything on your own time.

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The verdict: the narrative was all over the place, the action was so energetic I had to keep pausing to re-read dialog, but the dialog wasn’t interesting in anyway. Then the second half reveal of space patrol command and probably next season’s villain just came out of nowhere.

Two acts in 7 minutes devoted to not telling a coherent story or presenting our characters in a new or interesting way is not worth your time. Not even in short format anime.

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Space Patrol Luluco – 08

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Luluco faces a death sentence this week and there’s nothing she can do about it. Facing her sudden mortality, she asks Nova-kun to be her first and last kiss, which he agrees somewhat dismissively as ‘fine either way.’

It’s a wonderful kiss ending on Luluco’s final second of life and she falls to the ground. Except it’s all been a mistake. She will certainly die and nothing can be done about it, except she has another 60 years to live!

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This week’s 3.7 star equivalent to Ogikubo is Magic Planet and home to the sorcerer’s stone, a magic school and a possibly only a single witch. Luluco is there alone with Nova and quickly becomes nervous that the witches would be man crazy but her haste to get to the source of the Ogikubo signal only leads her to being stuffed with magic death mushrooms.

To be clear, watching Luluco’s gun barrel/anus stuffed with mushrooms was genuinely funny, and I found the lack of growth in her relationship with Nova despite the kiss and high drama charming, but this was not a great episode. The setting was basically empty except for the witch, and her only purpose is to reference Little Witch Academia.… and I don’t remember that show at all.

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This is a hard one to rate. The story was very small, the pacing felt dragged despite the 7 minute run time, and there wasn’t any action or much over the top stuff to be distracted by.

But the kiss scene was great and the mushroom stuffing was worth a chuckle. If I could remember what Magic Show it was referencing, I’m sure I’d appreciate it slightly more… however, compared to last week’s vaguely Kill La Kill inspired piece, which was interesting even without the obvious references, this one didn’t. Hrm…

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Space Patrol Luluco – 07

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This week’s Luluco lurched us into the next arc and, to be honest, the dialog was so dense and the goings on so going all over the place, I’m not entirely sure what to make of it.

After a recap, team Space Patrol finds themselves in orbit of a thread planet that is clearly making more references to Kill La Kill but it’s also apparently auctioning Ogikubo. So the team investigates and quickly finds the 3.5 star rating accurate replica of Ogikuba is really a front for a space criminal to steal everyone’s life energy.

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The hook of the censored out criminals dastardly plan is that everyone looped by his threads sees him as their greatest desire. Luluco sees him as Nova, which is how we see him, but that doesn’t stop her from trying to arrest him for some kind of space fraud.

Fortunately, the chief’s fire lights the criminal on fire — and the planet on fire — and everyone escapes. Nova muses that the criminal was possibly just lonely but Luluco isn’t so sure.

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Roll Credits…

Bits of this episode were funny — like the villain starting to talk about only being defeatable by scissors but immediately catching fire and all the use of on screen text –but in all honesty, the abruptness of the story didn’t grip me. Too much time was dedicated to the recap and too little to the villain. And because he’s clearly a throw away, it wasn’t as satisfying as previous abrupt fights.

It was good, and if I have a chance to watch it again (probably a few times) I’m sure I will appreciate it more but, for what it was, 3rd season’s opener stumbled over the line.

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Space Patrol Luluco – 06

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Luluco’s free-spirited, proudly non-normal mom Lalako Godspeed steals both Luluco’s dad’s frozen body and the e-auction is on for the illicit sale of her home Ogikubo. Now just a pile of bones but still full of spirit, the director general has his secretary microwave and reanimate the slab Keiji’s brain they still have

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Bodyless but still in good shape mind-wise, Keiji leads the others on a mission to shoplift back the shoplifted town from his wife, while making a personal appeal for her to return to normality.

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Lalako won’t hear of it, but before she can ship Ogikubo to the winning bidder via wormhole, Midori uses her modded Blackhole app to pluck Lalako’s ship with her gigantified hand. A struggle ensues, and the ship with Luluco and the others ends up in some distant galaxy/dimension. END OF SEASON 2.

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Space Patrol Luluco does what all good Gainax pieces, but particularly Gurren Lagann, excelled at: playing with leaps in scale at a breakneck pace. At first, Lalako’s ship seem’s massive and imposing, as it’s able to grab the highest skyscraper and pull Ogikubo up from its roots.

Then, all of a sudden, the town folds up into a normal brown cardboard box for shipping, and then Midori’s hand dwarfs the ship and the shipping wormhole. It all brought me back to thinking about the classic National Geographic map of the known universe. No matter how huge you think things are out there, they just get huger and huger!

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This episode-let kept up the fever pace of the last one, packed with action, laughs, imaginative twists, goofy justice speeches and blink-and-you-miss ’em visual gags. Suffice it so say, Luluco’s life isn’t going to be normal for the foreseeable future.

At the same time, there’s enough heart present for me to hope for a day when Luluco and her irascible mom can reconcile, even if becoming a family with her dad is out of the question. Not to mention if she’ll ever be able to restore her dad and her hometown, get back to Earth, and reach that dreamy romantic ideal of the breathy, ethereal end credits. We’ll find out “next season…”

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Space Dandy – 02

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Space Dandy is the intergalactic comedy that takes its time and hangs out in bars—ramen shops. When none of Dandy’s alien quarry turns out to be rare, he ejects Meow into space, only letting him back into the ship when Meow promises he knows the location of a Phantom Ramen. A wide-ranging culinary journey ensues, with the contents of the bowls growing more bizarre and outrageous as Dandy’s bank account empties.

So what happens here is that Dandy, eager to make a buck, agrees to spend what money he does have matching noodle bowls with his unreliable new sidekick, who Dandy knows is only interested in eating and wasting time. All the while, Meow is inadvertently telling the enemy Dr. Gel exactly where they are by tweeting each restaurant they patronize. Dandy also meets the lovely (and limber) Scarlett, who takes out the first wave of Gel’s foot soldiers not to save Dandy, but as payback for spilling her bowl.

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Honey may give Space Dandy the time of day, but that’s her job. Scarlett is not the least bit seducd by Dandy’s wiles, especially when he asks for money. Still, once QT discovers Meow’s tweets and his phone is disposed of, the threat from the Gogol Empire is neutralized. It’s about this time when we started wondering how Dandy & Co. get themselves killed this week, but the episode’s final act didn’t follow that pattern; not exactly, at least. The only similarity to last week’s ending is that Dandy and Meow end up in another tense, dangerous situation, as the source of the stale but tasty Phantom Ramen turns out to be in a wormhole.

But after that mind-bending journey they emerge on the other side in a very calm, eerily gorgeous alternate dimension, and the comedy is put on hold for the surprisingly moving story of an ancient Earth-trained alien ramen master, possibly inspired by Jiro Dreams of Sushi (which we still have yet to see). The alien lives there alone for centuries, and his tears are the secret ingredient. After hearing the old alien’s tale, out of deference, Dandy lets him decide if he wants to come back with them. He declines, and in a hint of karmic justice, Meow loses his to-go bowl in the wormhole, and only Dandy gets the final taste ever.

9_superiorRating: 9 (Superior)

Suisei no Gargantia – 01

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While retreating from a failed all-out attack on an alien enemy’s base Galactic Alliance pilot Lt. Red (Ledo) and his mobile weapon Chamber are swallowed up into a space-time distortion. He wakes up after six months of hibernation to witness several humans trying to open his hatch. Hungry for answers, when they leave Chamber alone for the night he gets out to explore, but he is discovered by locals Amy and Pinion. He grabs Amy as a hostage and runs, but he ends up outside, where Chamber ascertains that they’re on a giant seagoing ship on Earth, a world mentioned only in legend.

Not that it was hard, but this series kicks Majestic Prince out of the water for pure space battle porn, starting with a battle to end all battles that not surprisingly goes pear-shaped for the humans. We went into this episode with high expectations. The director helmed and drew several episodes of the original Eureka Seven. It’s produced by Prod I.G., which usually does top-notch work. And the series comp and script were penned by Urobuchi Gen, who we know is capable of excellent stuff, having also written Puella Magi Madoka Magica and Requiem for the Phantom.

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Throw in some great female seiyus (including the voices of Kotoura, Sasami, Koko, Mei, and Erza), and what looks like a huge budget, and you have all the ingredients for success. And succeed it does. The opening battle is a tour de force of sci-fi mayhem, with a lot of different weapons and formations and tactics flying around the screen. After that thrilling and auspicious start, the episode slows down and takes its time; we go from a fantastic hi-tech world to somewhere that wouldn’t be out of place in a Miyazaki film, only with battleships that float rather than fly. We can be lucky to see one of these worlds in a series; this one has both.

The rolling-out of characters is also kept to a minimum, allowing us to get a feel for what we’re in for. Red is a fish-of-out-water, but he’s not alone; his trusty mecha Chamber is there to help him, and it won’t be long before he can communicate with the natives, the vast majority of whom are quite attractive. Swift, fire-haired Amy in particular is a great contrast to silver-haired, cool, calculating Red. They’re ideal stand-ins for their respective worlds, and it should be fun to learn more about this new world Red finds himself in, and  what he does with the adventure fate has handed him.

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Rating: 9 (Superior)

Stray Observations:

  • Nothing says “implacable foe” like when an attack that massive and well-coordinated still fails.
  • We liked what Colonel Kugel said before heading to his death. He’s not about to let Red die for him before his time.
  • This episode flowed very well throughout, and we loved the shift from the breakneck space battle to the slower and more casual pace of the second half on Earth.