Tari Tari – 12

The Choir/Badminton Club continues preparing for their white festival musical drama, despite having their formal request denied by the student council. They reach out to the shopping district association, which agrees to distribute pamphlets for their show. Taichi continues to delegate to other, more skilled parties, and Konatsu secures Ueno for piano, despite Hirohata’s objections. Wakana bumps into Naoko while visiting her mom’s grave and lets her listen to her song. The principal tries to take a stand, but the developers are having none of it and institute a strict curfew for all students.

There are many at Shiro High who are ready and willing to lie down and listen to whomever seems most like being in charge; in this case, the developers who are replacing the school with condos. Konatsu isn’t one of those people, and she makes her voice heard whenever she can. As little as we’ve actually enjoyed her character throughout the run, we have to give it to her here, she’s not taking anything lying down. Her obstinancy is a rarity among her classmates, but her fellow club members are behind her 100%. In fact, it was Wakana, not Konatsu, who first insisted the show must go on. She goes to bat for the club by begging the shopping district to help with advertising, but this has the unhappy side effect of gaining the attention of the bad guys.

But one thing Konatsu did was inspire that pathetic wimp of a principal to at least try to stand up against the developers. He doesn’t succeed, but the weight of what he’s done is definitely still upon him, and we’ll look to him to step in and use whatever power authority he has left – little as it may be – to assist the likes of Konatsu and the Choir Club. At episode’s end, it’s raining the evening before the show. Without having peeked at the preview for the final episode, we suspect weather won’t be the problem. But we would hope those haughty developers get put in their place.


Rating: 7 (Very Good)

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Tari Tari – 11

Konatsu has written a script for the musical drama, and sets the club to work preparing. Wakana is writing the song, Sawa is doing the choreography, Taichi the sets, and Wien the props. However, the principal finally makes an announcement to the teachers, parents, and eventually students: the White Festival is being cancelled and the school is being shut down to make way for luxury condominiums. The club drifts apart as construction vehicles descend on the school, but one afternoon they all meet by chance in the hall. Wakana announces she’s finished her song, and wants everyone to sing it.

In Hanasaku Iroha, the Kissuiso inn was a character in and of itself: old and unappreciated by the winds of change, but beautiful, traditional, and warm. With five lively characters to keep track of, it could be easy to overlook the school they attend, but when we think back, it’s also a gorgeous building, with its gleaming hardwood floors, intricate outside tiling, ample natural light, neat half-moon sliding doors. We’ll bet the students took the beauty of this place for granted, and are only now appreciating it now that news has come down that it will be taken from them. This is something hinted at for some time, but it comes as a complete surprise to all.

The meek pushover principal procrastinates far too long, and culture fair preparations are already in high gear when he belatedly brings the hammer down, and a cruel hammer it is. In a painfully ironic scene, he cites Japan’s declining birthrate as Mrs. Takahashi’s newborn is crying, as if in defiance. For as big and beautiful as the school is, higher-ups have deemed it too big and occupying too valuable a property to allow a dwindling student body to continue using it. They want rich people living there. That baby isn’t the only one protesting: festival or no, Wakana wants her song heard, and the club is willing to sing it with her.


Rating: 8 (Great)