ID: INVADED – 11 – Three is a Nice Number

Whether the outline of John Walker in the sandy winds was a literal phenomenon or artistic license, the grit of the well storm makes the facts of the case clearer to Narihisago. Fukuda trapped him in the well hoping Narihisago would kill him in a rage…but Narihisago can tell this is another manipulation by Walker, and asks Fukuda for his help instead.

Fukuda used to be a whiz with numbers, and in this well his hole is gone, bringing back the arithmomania he drilled out in the real world. Narihisago pieces this together from Fukuda’s past three-stage gestures and even his outfit, which is packed with threes. As the storm churns, the Mizuhanome continually updates, and the cockpit from the lightning version of the well is transported to the desert version. The two of them start digging, hoping to find Hondoumachi.

Meanwhile, still in Kiki Asukai’s dream world, Hondoumachi checks the work Narishisago did while he was there for a year, and comes up with another important number: seven. The dates and times when victims’ bodies were found seemed random, but the M.O. of all the killers was to cause gradual, rather than instant death.

When she records the dates of the killing blows, rather than the times of death, everything matches up neatly: each of the seven serial killers have a designated day when they kill. If Walker arranged it this way, it could be an allusion to the seven days it took to create the world—or in his case, his new one.

Hondoumachi pays the Fukuda of that time a visit in order to get the final piece of the puzzle. After proving she knows things about him she normally couldn’t possibly know, as well as revealing her head-hole kinship, thus gaining his trust, she’s able to get the precise dates and times when he dreamed of John Walker.

Whoever Walker is, they visited Fukuda in his dreams during that time. The one time that’s out of place with normal sleeping hours occurred not while Walker was asleep at work, but in off on a business trip, in a different time zone. The member of the department who was on that trip the day of Fukuda’s dream was Chief Hayaseura, whom she calls to confirm it.

Back in the real world, Togo has Mitsuoka check out Momoki’s house again and carefully observe everything. She notices a picture that was not there last time she visited, and has him scan it. He finds cognition particles, but they’re not Momoki’s. They come from a photo of Narihisago with his wife and daughter. In other words, it was a plant and Momoki was framed as a diversion.

In another demonstration of her almost scary luck, Hondoumachi is ejected from the cockpit moments after confirming Walker’s identity. She informs Narihisago and Fukuda of her findings, and the storm clears sufficiently to allow Togo to have all three extracted. For now, the well-in-a-well shenanigans would seem to be over, at least for these three.

The well storm also ended up working in their favor, and even being a crucial to their success. While the storm was raging, no one from outside could observe them, meaning the outside and inside times weren’t synched. Of course, now that they’re back in the world, it will be a mad dash to detain Hayaseura, who may know from the activities at the Wellside that it’s only a matter of time before he’s caught.

Indeed, just as Togo is ordering an arrest warrant, the Wellside goes dark, and Hayaseura heads to a chamber where Asukai Kiki has been asleep since vanishing from the hospital, serving as the totemic “Kaeru” in Narihisago’s cases. Only now it’s apparently time for her to wake up. No doubt he has a use for her that will further his plans.

At the end of the day, even a casual detective such as myself could tell there was no way Momoki was Walker, and that the most likely candidate among the staff was Hayaseura. I just wish we knew his character a little better, to give the revelation more weight. That said, bringing the mastermind behind the death of his family to justice is what Narihisago deserves. No doubt he’d die to gain that outcome, but with Hondoumachi and Fukuda by his side, it may not have to come to that.

Ace Attorney – 01 (First Impressions)

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Ace Attorney is a part-mystery, part-courtroom drama, part-comedy that wears its heart on its sleeve and shoots from the hip. It’s a super-straightforward show, with a clear and concise structure so far:

  1. Victim murdered (by a talking Rodin’s The Thinker!);
  2. Trial of wrongly accused (his childhood friend Yahari) begins;
  3. Rookie defense attorney Naruhodo Ryuuchi pokes holes in the story of the prosecution’s witness and successfully accuses the witness of doing the deed, exonerating Yahari;
  4. Another victim is murdered.

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Enjoyment of this show is in the purity of that structure, as well as the delicious details. There are a lot of gags in this episode, despite it starting with a woman getting her head stoved in by a statuette.

Not all of the gags hit, but many do, and the trial moves swiftly and purposefully as Ryuuchi, backed up by his stunning boss Ayasato Chihiro, determines the key to saving his friend and client from the slammer is the murder weapon and the time it reports, which is two—really fourteen—hours off after accompanying victim to New York City.

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Ryuuchi is fueled not just by the support of Chihiro, but by the memory of when Yahari was once his advocate in a classroom trial years ago. It’s never in doubt that Yahari isn’t the culprit, because we witness Yamano do the deed in the cold open.

About Yamano and the prosecution: they sure made things easy for Ryuuchi! I mean, yeah, as a rookie he still sweated when they continually countered his objections with more “facts”, but once he had something they couldn’t counter, Yamano literally explodes into somebody who isnot only a credible witness by any means, but also a highly suspicious suspect.

Being not too far removed from Food Wars, I enjoyed the battle-like fever pitch of the trial, with points and objections being fired around like projectile weapons, and gusts of wind knocking people off their feet. It’s all very absurd and fun.

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There’s also an absurdity in the sheer specificity of that darned murder weapon. I mean, how the heck did this Yahari guy have the technical wherewithal to construct not one but two talking Thinker clocks? Why The Thinker? 

Why a clock? The show doesn’t really care about those details…and at the end of the day, neither do I, but it is pretty weird nonetheless, and makes me wonder what other strange, very specific objects this show can come up with.

This episode also succeeded on a introductory level, telling us everything we needed to know, but still continuing on its purposeful course of holding and resolving a murder trial, without overwhelming us with characters not pertinent to that trial.

My only “objections”? Well, the mystery isn’t all that compelling, and the show itself is pretty crude-looking, with rather stiff (if generally attractive) character design. I’m also a bit miffed they killed off Chihiro in the first episode, but I’m sure the show had it’s reasons, and I look forward to hearing its case next week…even if I can’t strongly recommend this show.

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