Guilty Crown – 09

Shu is on a train with Hare when Yahiro leaps aboard, spilling drugs as he goes. Shu tells Hare he needs to talk to him. He learns that Yachiro and his terminally ill brother Jun had to flee the very facility he sold Shu out to get into. Shu vows to harbor them with Undertaker help, but he’s being surveilled by Major Segai, who corners them with snipers and endlaves. Shu promises to save Jun if Yahiro lets him draw out his void, but he fails and he himself is the one who kills him. Hare, meanwhile, had been following Shu all along.

When Shu sees Jun in the void world, in the setting of the day of Lost Christmas, he has a tough choice to make. Jun wants to die, and the void Shu has appropriated from Yahiro – the shears, are the means to do it. It isn’t just that Jun is tired; it’s that he wants to go out on his terms. His illness lets him see everyone’s dark side – including his bro’s. If he has to continue to see that, he’ll grow to hate him, and he doesn’t want to die hating his only brother. Jun forces a decision here: he makes use of his apocalypse cancer to possess an endlave, so it’s basically ‘kill me before I go mad and kill everyone’.

In the heat of the moment, Shu cuts Jun’s lifeline as requested. Shu, the kid who’s growing more and more confident and assertive (and educated in basic tactics), has killed his first human being. It was under highly supernatural circumstances, but he killed someone all the same. This is going to weigh on him, and perhaps eliminate all the progress he’s made with Undertaker. We’re really interested in seeing where this goes, along with how much Hare saw, and what she thinks of it all. What’s her void?


Rating: 3

Advertisements

Guilty Crown – 01

Shu is an introverted student who makes films, and suddenly gets caught up in the war between “terrorist” groups and the government, in a post-semiapocalyptic Tokyo recovering from a viral war. He happens upon Inori, an idol who is also a member of the resistance led by Gai and on the run. He misses his first chance to save her, but doesn’t waste his second, making a pact with her to take the guilty crown and fight beside her.

Sweet Cambridge, this is the fourth series debut that we’ve had no choice but to score a four. Who knows if the season can keep up this momentum, but if it can it will go down as one of the best we’ve had the pleasure to watch. This Guilty Crown will be a big part of it, and its sleek, sexy debut is just about as close to perfection as you can get. Not a moment was wasted and no detail left out. It kicked ass on pretty much all levels.

From its quiet, beautiful opening that layered Inori’s music video with her guerilla activities, to the shounenesque climax and payoff. it exhibited perhaps the best animation, art direction, and character design of the season so far, and had a rich, involving soundtrack to match all the eye candy. Shu is well thought-out too, he’s a wimp, but his growth of cajones is rapid and believable. He’s just stepped into a new and very dangerous world, but he seems well-equipped to deal with it. The next episode can’t come soon enough.


Rating: 4