Sukitte Ii na yo – 11

Kai confronts and lambastes Megumi for trying to bring Mei and others down. When Asami and Aiko tell Megumi that Yamato and Mei are going to spend their first night together, she tries to bribe them and fails. Her attempt to banish Momo from her circle of “friends” also backfires, and they all abandon her. She leaves the agency before her shoot and pigs out on junk food in the dark. Meanwhile, Yamato and Mei spend the day at Land. Their plans are sidetracked when they’re stuck with Nagi, but they stay at the hotel anyway, and settle for spooning. In the morning the modeling agency calls Yamato saying they can’t get ahold of Megumi.

We knew Megu-tan would be in for a world of pain following her abortive scheming last week, and indeed, the hammer of reckoning comes down hard on her. However, we didn’t expect that witnessing her comeuppance would result in us actually feeling sorry for her. Damn you, Sukitte Ii na yo! Why can’t she just be one-dimensionally evil like King Oberon! We kid. Basically, Megumi’s current situation is the result of going down the wrong road to happiness: making herself cute and beautiful, becoming a model, and using her fame and wealth to make friends. The thing is, none of this is making her remotely happy. After a particularly bad day in which everyone gives her a dressing-down at once, she decides she’s had it, retreating to her flat to gorge on chips of various kinds.

The episode does a great job balancing Megumi’s downfall with the rise of Yamato+Mei, one more thing Megumi isn’t happy about. The episode teases us with the possibility of the lovebirds spending their first night together, but their chance encounter with Nagi puts the kibosh on that right quick. But as contrived as that happenstance was, we didn’t really mind it that much. We just couldn’t see Yamato and Mei jumping into the sack so suddenly considering their mutual nervousness, and their decision to take it nice and slow is true to their characters. They probably could have come to that decision if they’d had the room to themselves, but Nagi just made it that much easier. What we fear, however, is Megumi and/or Yamato feeling guilty for Megumi’s meltdown.


Rating: 9 (Superior)

Sukitte Ii na yo – 04

Yamato gives Mei a bracelet to match his as a public symbol of their love, and rumors spread about their going out, which reach the promiscuous Hayakawa Kakeru. He meets Yamato and Mei for lunch on Saturday, but Hayakawa suggests Mei go out with more guys, upsetting her, and she leaves. Yamato punches him. Back at school, Hayakawa whines to Aiko, but the conversation turns nasty. Mei overhears and has choice words for Hayakawa, who runs off in a snit. An off-guard Aiko calls her and Yamato a couple of idiots and also walks off. Mei meets Yamato in the courtyard, and when she asks him he admits he slept with Aiko. Mei kisses his bandaged hand.

Mei is in top form this week, amidst a barrage of caustic crap from the unpleasant  self-hating Hayakawa. She doesn’t let herself get fazed by that barrage, and wastes no time disposing of his number in her phone once she sees his true colors. He’s a tomcat and a cad, amassing a legion of FWBs but having no genuine happiness to show for it. He can’t have what she and Yamato have, can’t stand it, and so tries to destroy it. He fails spectacularly. He’s also a coward and a brute, lashing out at Aiko when she gives him her ear, and even grabbing/shoving Mei when she gives him a piece of her mind in Aiko’s defense (Mei’s brave “smacker” comment was pretty freakin’ boss.) Pushing girls around: NOT COOL. Not expecting thanks, Mei makes it clear to Aiko that if it’s a fight she wants, she won’t let her win. Aiko, who fired the first salvo last week, pretends it’s not a big deal…but we know better.

Then we have Yamato himself, the guy Aiko wants and Hayakawa wants to be. He first gets kudos for suggesting that things may get easier for Mei if she made more friends, which is easier to do when she’s with him. It’s a bit heavy-handed, sure, and maybe Yamato and Mei would be just dandy if everyone simply left them the hell alone, but this is high school and that’s not going to happen. Mei could use more allies. Yamato has some points deduced for agreeing to yet another date that’s not just the two of them, and for again leaving her alone with a wolf. Like last week, he comes out on top by promptly detecting Hayakawa’s knavery, slugging him, and making it clear Mei is his (a bit possessive, but his heart’s in the right place). One concern is the “Nagi” who calls him. By episode’s end he tells Mei the truth about him and Aiko. Here’s hoping he continues telling her the truth – it’s the best aphrodisiac.


Rating: 9 (Superior)

P.S. Yamato’s a great deal taller than Mei – we were curious just how much taller. If Mei is a pretty average 153cm tall (5′), that makes Yamato 187cm (6’2″). Mei’s in for a lot of neck-craning. The image to the left is to scale (1px=1cm).

Deadman Wonderland 12 (Fin?)

Well, I guess that was a kind of an ending, but it certainly didn’t answer all that many questions that were posited in the build-up of this series. Karako and Ganta manage to get Nagi to snap out of it; Ganta protects Shiro and asks for her forgiveness, and then proceeds to kill Genkaku (whom we get a little background on) with his best Ganta Gun bullet yet. And then…the series just kinda…ends.

Toto, who had just been introduced, just shows off how deadly he/she is by totally wasting the second grader, and he/she seems to want to kill Ganta, but none of that happens. Everybody seemingly runs out of time. The only sure thing is that Ganta and Shiro are friends again. But even that isn’t certain, because we know that Shiro is Red Man, and if Ganta ever found out that she was the one who killed his class, he’ll surely be none the kinder.

So what, are we supposed to expect a second season? I’m not all that okay with that. I was invested for twelve episodes, and even though by the tenth or eleventh it was pretty clear things weren’t going to be resolved, that doesn’t mean I have to like it. AnoHana was a brillant series that managed to accomplish everything it set out to do and then some, in only eleven episodes. Now after twelve of this, I feel like more effort should have gone into bringing the story to a conclusion, It’s a good story; why drag it out? Rating: 3.5

Deadman Wonderland 11

Things can’t get much worse, but they will -that’s a good slogan for Deadman Wonderland. After managing to survive the first raid attempt, Karako rallies what’s left of Scar Chain to attempt to rescue Nagi. She keeps Ganta out of it, guilty of what she’s already put him through. Little does she know, her dear leader doesn’t want to be rescued, or even to live. And he doesn’t want anyone else to live either. He’s become a nihilist.

Ganta, desperate to do something and make a difference, trains with Crow – losing nearly all his blood in the process – and is introduced to a very creepily friendly Mockingbird (aka Toto). In fact, true to his/her name, Toto mocks both Crow and Ganta here, and it’s pretty unnerving to see Crow actually afraid of something; in this case, a deadman who’s stronger than him. When Genkaku calls Scar Chain out, having captured both Karako and Shiro (and seem to be threatening to rape them before they’re killed), Ganta is off to the races, having just improved his Ganta Gun by speeding it up, but very low on blood indeed.

This episode also had a brief cameo by Minatsuki, who gets Ganta out of an initial spot, but refuses to fight for Scar Chain – as she explains, she has to look out for Yoh, and she wasn’t framed; she is a murderer. She isn’t interested in freedom anymore. Ganta proceeds, and manages to knock out a bunch of undertaker guards with his faster blood bullets – but he’s far from out of the woods, as he still has to deal with Genkaku, the second grader, and a new, “sane” Nagi – while suffering from anemia. Most important, he has to apologize to Shiro. This was definitely one of Ganta’s more assertive moments…but will it mean anything? Just one more episode to determine that. Rating: 3.5

Deadman Wonderland 10

Shiro calls Ganta weak and a jerk. Truer words were never spoken. At least he admits he’s pathetic, but I have to say I was pretty disappointed with his reaction to Shiro saving his life by tossing the datachip bomb. Neither he nor the rest of Scar Chain could connect the dots until a totally tweaked-out Rokuro showed up at their hideout to spell it out to them. Of course, the damage is already done; Ganta has already slapped Shiro and told her he never wants to see her again. Treating Wretched Egg like that will have consequences.

So Rokuro arrives to take the remnants of the resistance hostage until Nagi/Owl defects to the Undertakers. The Priest pumps him full of drugs to speed things along. Beneath his earlier calm demeanor, Owl does seem to be barely-contained utter chaos personified. Rokuro comes with undertakers (both silly-looking freaks of nature) who seem ready to kill Ganta when Crow arrives in the nick of time with an awesome supersonic blood blade. He then refuses to help Scar Chain, basically contradicting what he just did (help a weakling) by saying only the strong should survive. Ganta may have potential to be strong, but he isn’t strong now. He seems helpless.

And losing Shiro, even temporarily, didn’t help. Now she’s making friends with Mockingbird, whose motives we can only guess. What we do know is that s(he) is androgynous and voiced by Miyuki Sawashiro, and gained some of Shiro’s trust by warning her about the datachip Ganta carried. Ganta needs to get his shit together. Weeks past, he was able to defeat both Crow and Hummingbird. Where the heck did that strength go? Finally, we get a brief glimpse at Makina’s personal crusade to expose Tamaki, but it seems the defence ministry is already well-aware and complacent with his methods and plans. I’m holding out hope Makina will have a role to play in Wonderland’s demise – if it occurs. Rating: 3.5

Deadman Wonderland 9

Before delving into this week’s bloodbath, I just want to note that I really like the ending sequence of Deadman Wonderland. That cropped shot of a Ferris Wheel at sunset combined with a soothing, upbeat dance track makes for a nice respite from the darkness of the previous twenty-two minutes. But the slideshow of photos – which didn’t mean much the first time we saw them, are given more gravity as the series has progresses. These are snapshots of the pasts of the characters, many of whom we just met last week.

Anywho, back to this week, one of the goriest yet, which is saying something. Star Chain suffers almost total losses, including Koshio and Nagi. The former dies in a blaze of glory, wasting a Necro Macro, while Nagi’s demise is far slower and more torturous (if he indeed dies, he’s pretty worse-for-wear). Specifically, a totally twisted second-grader with a massive blunt blade treats his body like a ham at the delicatessen, then relieves him of an arm. Even so, Nagi is one tough mutha, managing to knock out the Judas Rokuro and activating the elevator for Ganta and the others.

It’s all for naught though, as the data chip Ganta has been entrusted with isn’t the truth that will set them free at all; its’ a bomb, and Shiro arrives in the nick of time to snatch it away and toss it a safe distance away. The mission is basically a total failure, which explains why the undertaker corps withdrew before finishing Ganta off: their role was to put down Scar Chain, and they would seem to have succeeded. I was hoping Ganta would have gotten further. Now, who was that weird Ganta-looking guy with white hair Shiro bumped into in their HQ? Rating: 3.5

Deadman Wonderland 8

Thanks to Shiro, who seems to be back to normal (for now, of course), Ganta, Nagi and Koshio are saved when she drops in and destroys Genkaku’s guitar gun. We then see that Scar Chain is actually quite a large group of resistance fighters. We also learn that the crazyass priest is a former inmate and now part of Tamaki’s corps of anti-deadmen enforcers, or “undertakers”, who can counter branches of sin. So if there’s a war in Wonderland, Makina’s guards aren’t the only thing standing between Scar Chain and their freedom.

And there will be a war. It’s inspection week, which means all of Wonderland’s sadistic games are shut down and the prison is made to look normal and sqeaky-clean. Nagi doesn’t want revenge or to escape as much as he wants the prison’s secrets exposed to the world, where presumably the public will call for its termination. It won’t be easy though, with Tamaki and the undertakers on the prowl. It would seem, however, that Captain Makina shares this goal, if for different reasons. She doesn’t seem aware of Scar Chain’s plan, but I wonder if she’d let them proceed just because she’s sick of Tamaki.

Which brings us to Rokuro, a Scar Chain member who seems to be a double agent. He is in league with the undertakers, and I have no reason to believe he won’t betray his comrades – and Ganta, for whom he has no love – right when victory is in grasp. That’s just how this show has gone down so far. Even if Rokuro turns out to be good, Ganta still doesn’t know Shiro’s true deal. Lot on his plate, this kid. Rating: 3.5