Cardcaptor Sakura – 42 – A Light in Dark Places

It’s the big day of the performance, and Tomoyo pulls a double all-nighter to make the perfect Prince and Princess costumes for Sakura and Syaoran. I have to admit Tomoyo really outdid herself—Sakura looks outstanding—but for gosh sakes, get some SLEEP, girl! The play commences without a hitch, with the sleep-deprived but resolute Tomoyo providing narration.

Meiling steals the show as the villainous witch, despite the fact she didn’t want to play the villain! The crowd has a great reaction to Syaoran as the princess, but his performance suffers once he spots Yukito in the audience. Sakura, less so, since she mostly relies on her athletic ability in the fight scenes.

After defeating the witch and being told by the three faeries (played by Sakura’s three girlfriends) she can wake the princess with a kiss, Sakura gets right down to it. Her lips draw so close to Syaoran’s, neither he nor Touya in the audience can bear it. Syaoran pushes Sakura away, and just then a great inky blackness swallows everything whole…leaving the two of them in a void.

Syaoran soon vanishes too, leaving Sakura all alone. Not knowing what’s going on, she starts to cry, then realizes this could be the DARK Clow Card, in which case she can do something. When her magic doesn’t work she again despairs, but soon realizes that despite being surrounded by darkness, she continues to glow. Sure enough, the LIGHT Clow Card has resided in her heart since the first time she opened Clow’s book.

Because LIGHT and DARK are two sides of the same coin, they are portrayed as either sisters or lovers—I lean toward the latter. LIGHT mentions the name Yue to Sakura before she seals them both for a twofer, leaving Sakura to wonder who Yue is. The show seems to be indicating that Yue is Mizuki Kaho—or that Mizuki is Yue’s vessel. With four episodes remaining in this 11-episode second season, Sakura is sure to find out soon!

Fune wo Amu – 11 (Fin)

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Last week restored my faith in Fune wo Amu’s ability to engage and pull its audience in with an up-against-the-wall crisis that requires a tremendous group effort to pull off. But that same goodwill didn’t quite carry over in the show’s eleventh and final episode, which only reinforced a problem I’ve had since the eighth episode pushed us forward so many years without warning.

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I understand how the show basically needed to show us the ultimate payoff of a published Great Passage, but I maintain that it didn’t have enough time to tell that story, nor would extending the effort across, say, a full 26-episode series would have been possible before getting stale, monotonous, or over-contrived in an effort to stoke up some drama.

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Before the dictionary officially goes on sale, Matsumoto suddenly succombs to esophageal cancer he only told his comrades a day or so before his death. His death has been telegraphed so much, it didn’t elicit a shock in me so much as a shrug. Again, his death only underlines the problematic nature of leaping so far ahead in the dictionary’s timeline to a point where most people only look slightly different, but suddenly Matsumoto is at death’s door.

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The missing words episode was a temporary diversion from the fact the development of the dictionary didn’t feel as epic as it should have because the show skipped too much time.  Ditto Matsumoto’s death. He seemed like a nice guy and all, but he was a character with a tendency to spout flowery philosophy and little else. Post time-jump, it was hard to get a handle on the characters were; spending so much time with the new hire didn’t help matters.

So yeah, Fune wo Amu was, to me, the definition of “watchable,” but I won’t lie: I’m glad there’s no twelfth episode, because I’ve been mostly checked out since episode 6, when Majime’s attainment of Kaguya was sold as the Most Important Thing going on in the show, without ever really getting into why the two liked, let alone loved, each other.

The show had glimmers of greatness, but couldn’t help but feel either too drawn-out (earlier in the story) or too rushed (after the time jump). And there’s only so many ways you can present the metaphor of a ship lighting the way.

Considering how carefully the dictionary at the heart of its story was planned and prepared, Fune wo Amu too often felt unsure of itself and random in where it chose to focus its attention. That made it hard to stay involved.

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Tribe Cool Crew – 03

 tcc3_1Not even Haneru remembers the order to the words in their group name…

Tri-Cool, continues from last week’s on-stage challenge between Haneru and Kanon’s “Cool Dragon Dash Rising Brilliant Crew” and Kumo and Mizuki’s “Tribal Soul”. Kanon is nervous, never having performed in front of an audience, and neither of them really know what they are doing, but the audience is surprisingly enthusiastic.

We learn about some of the rules for a dance off and, after Haneru and Kanon ‘lose,’ we get a little more explanation as to why the audience thought Tribal Soul was better.

tcc3_2Haneru jumping vertically out of the frame again… down boy!

Basically, Tribal Soul was more in sync with the music, even though CDDRBC’s best moves were, well, better.

Regardless of the outcome, everyone is happy, the crowd only makes noise when encouraged to do so, and I have to wonder if Japanese audiences are just more polite than ours because, in my experience, this would have been a mean spirited, jeering filled, bottle throwing event.

Man I’ll never try to show off MY dance moves again!

tcc3_3my eyes are shaped like rabbit teeth!

Tri-cool is as cute as ever. It’s pepper under dog fueled never give up spirit is satisfying and harmless. It’s also, very very very obviously, kid stuff.

And like super sweet breakfast cereal, at my age, a single bowl is more than enough. Thanks for the happy highs Tric-cool! Best of luck. Old-man out!

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Tribe Cool Crew – 02

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Tri-Cool, as it calls itself at various times, pauses a moment from last weeks E & speed-fueled dance party and good vibes to remind us that people are also dramatic. People can get sad and not be able to do the fun things the want. Even people full of crazy dance moves!

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Kanon, aka Rhythm, is from a composed, appropriate family. It is unspoken, but given how seriously into controlled flower arrangements her mom is for their home, it doesn’t have to be stated: Kanon’s rents would fa-fa-fa’lip if they knew she was dancing.

Sorry Haneru! No dance team for you!

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Also, there was a moon walking kappa. (Though he was not a kappa later)

There were also group names proposed like “Cool Dash Rising Brilliant Dragon Crew!” Which Kanon doesn’t understand but Haneru assures her it has no meaning.

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As before, TCC episode two is a machine that only exists to make charming, occasionally funny, dancey silliness. Describing it as good would miss the point. I’m not even sure it is good!

The plot doesn’t matter. The characters don’t even matter. It’s just a whole crazy mess of fun.

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Tribe Cool Crew – 01

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Peppy dance music, free running, stylish and detailed character designs and a stylish world too: Tribe Cool Crew lays on the charm and happy energy as thickly as its plot is thin.

Honestly? I can’t complain!

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Part Sonic the Hedgehog, part arcade rhythm game, part ’80s throw back, Tribe Cool Crew is such a mash up of things I wouldn’t normally like that I’m completely stumped why I don’t. It just takes itself seriously about not being serious at all. It owns its goofy world and that world is fun, friendly and full of happy people.

That happy vibe is stunningly infectious.

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What are its blemishes? We’ll, the sudden shifts into rendered 3D during complex dance routines both work and are jarring. Also, the plot is about Haneru, an all energy 7th grader who loves dancing in a private place and Kanon, who appears to be a wealthy over achiever who watches him through a one way glass and also dances and has fallen for Haneru.

It’s also about Haneru loving a dance sensation and having tickets to go see that sensation’s live show. So… the plot isn’t very interesting or important.

I just found watching Tribe Cool Crew cathartic. The constant movement is a treat and the show just revels in its characters do that without dialog. Without interruption. If only the post Sonic & Knuckles Sonic games had been this much fun!

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