Jormungand – 21

Koko and her team continue to travel the world, making investments in tech companies and kidnapping the scientist Elena Baburin. Bookman meets her at Dulles through Hinoki, and he warns her not to “enter then enclave”, but from Miami she travels to Cuba, to extract the extralegally-held quantum physicist Leila Ibrahim Faisa, AKA Rabbitfoot. Bookman’s underlines believe all of Koko’s actions point towards the development of a quantum computer, which would make all present supercomputers – including those that guide missiles – obsolete. At Fort Meade, MD, Chief Plame of the Special Collections Service is deploying SEAL Team 9 to foil Koko’s plans to capture Rabbitfoot from Camp No in Guantanamo.

As we suspected, there’s far more to Koko and Dr. Miami’s plans than Hek-GG. Hek-GG is just the tip of the iceberg, and even Koko’s brother and father Floyd don’t know exactly what lies beneath the surface. The CIA can hazard an educated guess, though: Koko and Miami’s goal is nothing less than total domination of the digital world. If they succeed in building a quantum computer, stupidly faster than anything else in existence, they could rule a decent chunk of the world. This is supervillain stuff, but we’ve been invested in Koko and her team for so long, we’re firmly on her side even if they’re the bad guys.

Koko is also bored with the current order of things. She wants to shake things up, open the gates to a New World (the title of this arc). This episode was more getting ducks in a row and fortifying her team’s confidence and trust in her. And while they have supervillain plans well in the works, if they don’t have their bodyguards watching their backs and guarding them when they sleep, all of this could go out like a candle in the wind. Just one bullet – out of the millions upon millions of pieces of ordinance – could end Koko’s plans. She’s crossed Bookman and ignored his warnings. Now that she’s peeking out of the shadows, it’s open season.


Rating: 6 (Good)

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Jormungand – 18

With half the SR Squad eliminated by Kasper’s team, Koko heads to Umihotaru with hers to seek out the other half. The designated meeting spot is a trap, and Jonah is ambushed. Koko and the others drive off, and when Tojo retrieves Jonah, he follows in a stolen car. A multi-car tunnel shootout ensues, ending when the vehicles exit the tunnel and Lehm, Wiley and Valmet mop up the SR Squad pursuers from a helicopter. After having their activities covered up, Koko and Jonah go to the Bahamas with Tojo, where he’s tracked down Colonel Hinoki – and the family he thought was a lie.

So, have we come out of this two-parter with a greater understanding of and appreciation for Akihito Tojo? Well, that would have been inevitable in any episode in which his past was brought up. We’ve only known him to be a calm, level-headed, generally decent sort of fellow who seemed more comfortable handling paperwork and diplomacy than guns and knives. Now we know he once had a similar role with Colonel Hinoki’s SR Squad, but became disillusioned. Little did he know Mr. Hino himself gradually got sick of the SR Squad too. When an opportunity arose to have it wiped out in the bloodbath his subordinates thirsted for, he took it. The other squad members took turns calling Tojo a traitor, but he didn’t really betray anyone per se. He stopped seeing SR as a place where he fit, and no one in SR other than Hinoki really ever liked him anyway, so why stay?

The organization got deeper into arms dealing and also grew more militant and chaotic. In hindsight, Tojo left a sinking ship, and left his mentor behind thinking their views had diverged. But it turns out everything Tojo assumed or expected about Hinoki – be it his actions or his motives – turned out to be the opposite of reality – his fake Thai wife is real, and he has an adorable daughter too. And at the end of the battles, Hinoki makes sure Tojo understands there’s something to be said for being the last survivor of the SR Squad, suggesting Tojo’s spy instincts and talent for survival are better than Tojo himself realizes.


Rating: 7 (Very Good)