TenSura – 22 – The Extra Fairy

Rimuru, Ranga, and the kids head deep into the green and lovely Ulg Nature Park, and enter a palace-sized tree hoping to find the Queen of Spirits. They find themselves in a sneaky labyrinth that appears to be a straight path, but Rimuru requires his mental map in order to properly navigate through it.

They all hear a voice in their heads that must be some kind of telepathy, and before you know it they’re in a new chamber, which looks curiously like an arena.

Rimuru’s challenger appears: a magisteel golem controlled remotely by one of the labyrinth’s spirits. He easily defeats it with thread fetters and a flare, and its controller (and the voice in their heads) reveals herself as the fairy—and Demon Lord—Ramiris.

Voiced with great energy by Haruno Anzu, Ramiris is a delightful trip and a half, somehow even more hyperactive than Milim, and with a lot more voices. I found myself reveling in her many changes in mood and tone, as well as Rimuru’s growing impatience and incredulousness.

She’s also heard of Rimuru Tempest, leader of Jura…and slime. It’s the first time the kids learn Rimuru is actually a slime, and they’re suitably impressed and delighted. When Rimuru gives Ramiris some cookies as a peace offering, and tells her why they’ve come, she reveals that she’s the Queen of Spirits, who “fell from grace” into a Demon Lord, like Leon, who summoned both Ifrit and Shizu.

I enjoyed the gradual transition of Ramiris from obnoxious pest into someone to be admired (she completed the magisoldier Vesta’s team couldn’t…all by herself) and even venerated (she’s able to bestow divine protection). She empathizes with the kids’ plight, and shows them the path to the Dwelling of the Spirits.

Even if they can’t summon any interested superior spirits, they can always make new ones there. As for Rimuru, he’s proud he’s finally well on his way to fulfilling Shizu’s dream to free her students from premature demise.

Shingeki no Bahamut: Virgin Soul – 13

As it turns out, Charioce wasn’t being overconfident about his chances against the gods. Sure, it looks like a rout at first, but once the human king activates his secret weapon Dromos, the battle not only sways in man’s favor…Gabriel straight up runs with her tail between her legs, leaving her (very insubordinate) army to be wiped out. El tries to keep fighting, but he ends up being the overconfident one, and is rendered unconscious in a blast from Dromos.

It would appear the weapon worked almost too well, as Charioce doesn’t really seem to know what he should go do with himself after the gods retreat. That’s mostly because the winds literally blew Nina into his arms. When Nina sees that Jeanne, Kaisar and Rita are in danger (and who knows about Favaro; he’s blown elsewhere), she insists the king hug her.

Nina hopes she can appeal not to the cold, evil king, but the warm, kind young traveler who danced with her. He acquiesces to her demand, and before you know it boom, she’s a dragon again. This certainly seems to prove that only Charioce can transform her now.

The Black Knights try to capture her with a colossal golem, but Nina the dragon is far stronger than Nina the girl, and Nina the girl is redonkulously strong. As such, whenever it seems the golem has her number, she finds an extra store of strength with which to stay in the fight.

That fight ends when she finally dives through the golem, blasting a hole through it that deactivates it for good. Then the dragon approaches Charioce, who touches its head, casuing Nina to transform back into a (naked) girl.

Nina appears with the wagon to pick up Nina and Jeanne, while Kaisar distracts the guards, who quickly beat up and re-capture him. Favaro is still at large, which is why when the wagon is safely in the air, Rita jumps out to go “check on” the lads.

Left only with orders to look after one another, Jeanne decides her best next move is to head for the land of the gods, where she might be able to see El. She doesn’t know how to get there, but Nina remembers her granny talking about the place often, so they decide to head instead to Nina’s home village…which should be fun.

Meanwhile, Gabriel is a nervous wreck after having seen Dromos, which she didn’t think the humans would be able to build at all, let alone so quickly. That begs the question what the heck Charioce did to make that happen, and considering it’s the worst threat to the balance of the world since, well, Bahamut, it clearly falls under the category of “things safe in no ones’s hands.”

Dantalian no Shoka 2

This week was a clever little ball of yarn that gradually, confidently unravelled to reveal its mystery. Huey jumps to the conclusion that a phantom book of some kind is responsible for the curse that is keeping a young woman trapped in a house and murdering anyone near her. The truth is more interesting.

In reality, the curse was bestowed upon the lady by her grandmother. For generations, the females in her family suffered extremely abusive upbrinings, leading them to grow into homicidal maniacs. The family patriarch – a music box master – built a golem to conceal evidence of the murders. Huey and Dalian work together to uncover the mystery.

This series is full of excellent little details, like the 72 bells of the clock tower running the golem, the book in bookish Huey’s pocket protecting him from the crazy woman’s knife; and the subtle but obvious romantic tension between the dashing Huey and eerily beautiful Dalian, who are proving to have great chemistry. The series also promises a diverse array of mysteries in which Dalian’s inner library will prove vital to both the solving, and Huey’s survival.


Rating: 3.5