Uzaki-chan wa Asobitai! – 09 – Mother’s Intuition

After weeks of affable but otherwise frustrating wheel-spinning, the romantic part of this rom-com has really come along in the last couple episodes. I was hoping for that to continue in this ninth installment, and it mostly does. No there are no confessions or anything—those would be wildly out of character!

Instead, the romance comes through in the closeness and comfort these two have come to share. Oh, and Sakurai meets Hana’s mom, Tsuki! Unlike Uzaki, Sakura can only see the surface man. For one thing, she’s surprised her daughter’s senpai is a man at all. For another, he’s big and scary!

Mama Uzaki’s handling of her fear is demonstrated in a rather ingenious camera shot we don’t see often in rom-coms: while she appears to be across the kitchen table from them, the camera pulls back to reveal she’s really all the way across the room!

While Sakurai turns out to be more well-mannered than he looks, Tsuki’s misunderstandings continue when one of their cats jumps on her lap and Sakurai can’t help but stare at it. Being a big fan of a soap opera in which an older woman is being seduced by a younger man, she assumes Sakurai is looking at her chest, and thus has his eye on her.

This misunderstanding persists when Tsuki visits Hana and Sakurai at the cafe and meets the owner and Ami. They tell her the kids of customers love Hana, while older women love Sakurai’s blend of dignified hunkiness. This leads Tsuki to wonder out loud if he likes their attention, to which Ami’s reply is priceless: “He’s no cougar hunter. He’s just a doofus!”

Tsuki has cause to question Ami’s assurances when she overhears and misinterprets Sakurai and Hana’s conversation about the need to mature adult beans, how it leads to more richness, if one overindulges you’ll be so excited you can’t sleep, and how he plans on getting a good taste before long. It’s just coffee shop talk, but Tsuki is convinced Sakurai has the hots for her.

Back at Sakurai’s place, he and Uzaki are playing video games as usual, and after beating him soundly, she has him get her a drink, noting she’ll do “whatever it takes to see [him] frustrated.” This leads Sakurai to compare her to her “quiet and kind” mom, and Hana starts to carefully observe Tsuki at home.

The next day at the cafe, Uzaki’s persona and very way of speaking has transformed to the “quiet and kind” Sakurai apparently craved…and its a nightmare for him! Rather than endure her continue to act and sound as sweet and reserved as her mom, Sakurai literally folds, bowing and apologizing for messing up.

But by adding that he “prefers the usual Uzaki”, he sets off a heated lovers’ quarrel between them, as Ami perhaps over-zealously imagines the two taking on different personas based on the clientele. It’s clear that if Ami and not her dad were in charge, the cafe would become a very different (but not altogether worse) place!

Uzaki and Sakurai’s bickering is stopped not by the owner or Ami, but by one of the little kids whose mom is a regular. The girl gives them a ticket for a shopping district lottery, and as they head over to try their luck after work, the couple is chastened by having been scolded by a child. That said, Uzaki is also secretly elated Sakurai prefers her “usual” self—but damned if she’ll let him see it!

In keeping with situations that continue to help bring these two together, they end up winning the lottery’s grand prize: a two-night trip for two to Tottori, which is apparently the home of Detective Conan. And in the very next scene, they’re already there! I found it refreshing there was no debate or waffling over whether to go; they just go.

As for the bizarre oil-slick faces who are watching the couple…I’m somewhat stumped. Assuming they’re not Conan villains (I’ve never read or watched so I know next to nothing about that venerable franchise) I’m guessing it’s Ami and Sakaki, but would the two really drop everything to follow Uzaki and Sakurai to Tottori? We shall see…

Zoku Owarimonogatari – 05 – A Clockwork Araragi

Koyomi finds himself face-to-face with Kanbaru’s late mother Gaen Tooe in all her glory, but unlike Princess Kiss-Shot, being in her presence too long doesn’t make him suicidal. It’s a rare thing indeed for Koyomi to converse in such an intimate setting with an adult woman—again, Shinobu excluded—a cougar, if you will, made more strange by the fact she’s not even alive on Koyomi’s side.

Her frisky teasing and facial features remind him of Kanbaru, but there’s a decided sharp edge to her, quite becoming of a mother who left a monkey’s paw to her daughter—which was really a part of herself she split off. I like her leitmotif, which includes a cello, like her contemporary, Kaiki Deishu.

Tooe’s first piece of advice to a very nervous and confused Koyomi trying to figure out what’s going on is this: “knowing and not knowing don’t matter.” As proof, she infers just about everything about Koyomi’s situation and the state of his world, even though she entered the bath knowing nothing.

Tooe also underscores the necessity of properly facing your other side, as she and Izuko did, and as Suruga will have to do one day (referencing Hanamonogatari, which chronologically takes place a month after Zoku). Face it and acknowledge it not as a rival or blood enemy, but a partner, be it light or dark.

She also tells Koyomi to tell Suruga when he sees her next that her mother told her “don’t be like me.” She then mysteriously vanishes, leaving nothing but scratch marks on Koyomi’s back reading “Naoetsu High.”

When Dr. Ononoki inspects Koyomi’s back when they meet back up, the marks are gone, but Koyomi still thinks his old high school should be his next destination. Ononoki decides they’ll split up; she’ll visit Shinobu again to see if she’ll say anything else she might’ve wanted to say to Koyomi but couldn’t due tot he time limit.

Then she’ll search for Black Hanekawa to try to learn why she saved Koyomi from the Rainy Devil. Both tasks are designed specifically so she can avoid accompanying Koyomi to Naoetsu High, suggesting that while Koyomi’s influence has changed her personality and viewpoint, there’s still an innate part of her that is of this world, which understands Koyomi ultimately has to figure this out on his own.

To blend in at Naoetsu, Koyomi heads home to change into his uniform, only to discover it’s a girl’s uniform. One that, when he puts it on, actually fits pretty well. It would seem, then, that Koyomi’s theory about his other side in this world being Ougi was correct; for one thing, Ougi’s uniform is very baggy, as if it was meant for someone with a larger build—like Koyomi.

As he cross dresses without hesitation and rides his bike to school once more, Koyomi is extrmely cognizant of the fact that while he may have influenced a bit here and there in this world, it’s already starting to influence him, changing him into Ougi, which would mean Araragi Koyomi as we know him would cease to exist.

Meanwhile, after a fruitless visit to Shinobu’s, Ononoki finds Hanekawa hanging out with Mayoi and Kuchinawa…only it’s not Black Hanekawa, it’s Mini Hanekawa. Mayoi explains Hanekawa has many other sides, including her younger self. They’re all toasting the approaching end of this story, wherein this entire alternate world is revealed as nothing but the “product of a grand misunderstanding.”

That end is imminent because Koyomi is drawing closer and closer to noticing and facing his other side, Oshino Ougi. Strolling down the corridors of his old school, it doesn’t take him long to figure out, as Tooe thought he would, which part of that school meant the most to him – the classroom isolated from time and space.

It’s here where he finds Ougi, who has been waiting a very long time for him to show up. If that first episode of Owarimonogatari was the beginning of the end, and Koyomi saving Ougi at the end of Ougi Dark the end of the end, we’ve finally reached the beginning of the end of the epilogue, where no doubt Koyomi will suss out why this world exists, why he’s here, and how to return home—where he may be between titles, but at least the Karens are tall and the Surugas aren’t homicidal.