Ace Attorney – 03

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I enjoyed David E. Kelley’s legal “dramedy” Boston Legal, despite that fact it could often go off the rails of what was reasonable legal procedure, (particularly courtroom conduct) because it was goofy and funny. Ace Attorney is also goofy and funny, but I find myself unable to constantly overlook its cavalier attitude toward the sacred institution of the law.

Mayoi’s trial is a damned free-for-all from the start, when Mitsurugi Reiji calls a witness in the middle of his opening statement, before Naruhodo even gets a chance to say his part. The witness is Det. Itonokogiri, whose testimony is so full of holes a mouse could mistake it for cheese.

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Oh, and the cheese is laid on thick here, when after Naruhodo rather easily exposes the good detective’s inconsistencies, Mitsurugi changes “died instantly” to “died pretty much instantly.” That said, he also makes the mistake of calling another unreliable witness to the stand.

This witness is apparently meant to titillate the men in the courtroom and little else, while Mitsurugi is concerned only with theories he can prove with facts in the courtroom, regardless of whether those theories point the finger at the entirely wrong person, i.e. Mayoi. It’s all rigged!

Wen Naruhodo breaks the pink bombshell (her transition sex kitten to fist-pounding harridan is hilariously abrupt) and Mitsurugi calls for an adjournment so he can go over all the evidence Naruhodo keeps pulling out of his pockets (real professional, that!) things get even more ridiculous, when Naruhodo tracks down the witness’s boss.

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Konaka Masaru is a grotesque joke of a character, with his flamboyant wardrobe, goofy office, and constant use of Bad English in his speech. This guy also happens to be the kingpin of a massive empire of blackmail at every level of society with the front of an IT company.

He also has the motive to be Chihiro’s true killer, since she’d been investigating him for years. And with one phone call, Konaka gets Haruhodo arrested as the new prime suspect in her murder. Hwhaa?

With lawyers going around acting like detectives, detectives acting like judges, and absurd circus trials with no semblance of order, this is a dark, fallen, poorly-animated world, and I feel bad for anyone with pure justice in their heart who has to live in it. Fortunately, I don’t, and so I’m checking out.

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Ace Attorney – 02

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When he arrives for a dinner date with Chihiro and her sister, Naruhodo finds Chihiro dead, the sister cowering in the corner, and the Thinker clock and broken glass strewn around the floor. Just then, the police burst in, led by Detective Itonokogiri Keisuke, and the sister Mayoi (Yuuki Aoi) ends up locked in jail, suspected of murdering Chihiro.

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So Naruhodo has another mystery on his hands (including who called those cops so fast!) despite the fact he is a defense lawyer, not a detective. In Law & Order, you have two separate groups doing those two jobs, but Naruhodo does it all, and quite haphazardly.

What he isn’t—at least not initially—is Mayoi’s defender. That job falls to some mustachioed bigwig lawyer Chihiro told Mayoi to contact if she ever got in trouble. He seems willing to take on the case…until the prosecutor is announced: the intimidating, Undefeated Mitsurugi Reiji; he of the incredibly tacky office. Little too much crimson there, sport?

Detective-wise, Naruhodo finds Mayoi’s phone with her last conversation with Chihiro recorded on it (for some reason), and gets the actual detective (who seems a bit of a dolt) to reveal the name of his witness, the hotel room of which Naruhodo visits for a hot minute (and finds a suspicious bedazzled screwdriver).

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Anywho, virtually no one wants to defend poor Mayoi now that Mitsurugi is the prosecutor, so Naruhodo searches his soul and determines despite his personal ties to the murder victim and the fact it’s completely improper, he’ll be the one to defend her.

That’s fine with Mayoi, because that’s what she wants too after noticing how hard he worked to find her a replacement for Mustache, getting soaked in the rain and covered in sakura petals. They both have a cute little flirtation in which they ask at the same time, then both bump their heads on the glass.

So now we’re set up for Naruhodo’s second and by far most important case of his life, and Mitsurugi isn’t going to go easy on the rookie. We still know little of the case but small clues here and there, but I wonder if Mayoi’s spirit medium training will come into play.

What isn’t in doubt at all (at least for me) is that Mayoi will be exonerated and Mitsurugi will be handed his first loss. I’m willing to swim in this clunky sea of mediocre animation at least one more week to see how he pulls it off!

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No Game No Life – 10

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After its most exciting, mind-pretzeling game to date, NGNL backs off a bit, giving its characters a respite in preparation for what’s looking like the closing battle of the series. A couple of those characters, namely Kurami (I don’t like spelling her name Clammy) and Fil (or Feel, however you feel you need to spell it is fine); now solid allies of Team Blank.

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Some restless viewers could be forgiven for saying “Hey…Let’s get on with [the Warbeast battle] already!”, but I happen to be in a patient mood at this stage of No Game, and the leisurely contents of 9/10ths of this episode served a key purpose: exploring the very new bond between Sora and Kurami, as well as exploring more about what her deal is with Fil (turns out, her family is basically “owned” by the Nilvalens, of which Fil is presently the de facto ruler).

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We were less interested in Elven sociology and more intrigued by the new, far less confrontational attitudes between Sora and Kurami. With his memories still clear in her head—and his in hers—they’re now essentially at a level of trust and intimacy normally reserved for lifelong fiends. That intrigues us, because coming from a NEET/hikikomori background, Sora (and Shiro) aren’t good at making friends…like, at all, back home.

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But here in Disboard, they’ve made friends essentially by defeating them at games, something they’d neither be willing or able to do as shut-ins with the anonymous [-blank-] handle. Kurami and Sora had some nice moments, moments that might not have been possible had the show jumped straight into the Warbeast game. And now, as the next game begins, Kurami and Fil are on the sidelines, making sure the Warbeasts don’t cheat Imanity, whose potential they now believe in.

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“Dissapointment”, then, is what we’re sure marks Kurami’s face in reaction to Blank’s arrival in the game world, which happens to be Tokyo, the world they came from, where their potential was only good for topping Hi-Score lists while staying out of the sunlight. This makes me suspect the Warbeasts read their minds and found the venue where they’d be least effective. Will they be able to snap out of the dural ectasia brought by their surprise “return” home, or will Steph and Jibril have to step up to the plate?

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truckP.S. We’re sure most of you are aware, but there are trucks like this all over Tokyo. IMO, there aren’t enough trucks like that in America!

No Game No Life – 09

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It’s rare for me to be as royally stumped as I was at the beginning of this episode, with regards to how things were going to sort themselves out. Sure, I had an inkling some kind of game was being played, but the manner and result of the game escaped me completely, disoriented as I was, like Shiro, by the sudden upheaval of reality.

Steph and Jibril quite reasonably assume Shiro lost and had her memories altered. But there was a very good reason why Sora spoke so clearly and deliberately to Shiro before vanishing into thin air a day and a half ago: he was providing her—and me—all the clues we would need to figure out what was going on and how to proceed. Slowly, but surely, we piece this impeccably-structured mystery back together.

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“I believe in you.” Upon first meeting him, the young Shiro told the young Sora how “empty” he was. She didn’t mean it with malice, but because she made connections no one else could (or would). But there also happened to be some truth to it: there was indeed an emptiness in Sora’s existence, one that was filled upon meeting his sister.

“The two of us are always one.” But that void-filling went both ways: just as Sora’s name suggests an empty sky, Shiro’s denotes a similarly vast expanse of whiteness. Upon meeting each other, everything turns to the vivid color we’re used to when this show is in normal operations. What they have is beyond trust; beyond faith. So Sora knows he’ll be able to count on her not to let Steph and Jibril cut the game short with another.

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“We’re bound by a promise.” Shiro thinks hard, even if she “blows out”, for while the pledges of Disboard are almost infinitely interpretative, there’s a canny inexpungibility to her bond with Sora, one the pledges can never completely overcome. Shiro searches her vast repository of memory, and recovers the knowledge that a day and a half ago, Sora challenged Kurami Zell to a perilous game of “Existence Othello.” Yikes!

“We’re not the heroes of a shounen manga.” In another memory Shiro recalls, Sora tells her “you don’t change yourself. You change how you do things.” This conundrum won’t be solved with brute force, or yelling, or by changing herself, but by looking things differently, which she achieves by having Jibril scan her room for magic and finding…lots.

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“We always win a game before we start.” The game is still in progress, in that very room; Sora’s existence hasn’t disappeared. And it’s a game he would not have started had defeat been possible. Even when he’s on the cusp of defeat, he has faith Shiro will take over, using the last three white (=Shiro) stones he left her to turn the tide and soundly beat Kurami, returning Sora into physical being and ending the illusion.

“I’m going to get the last piece we need to bring over the Eastern Federation.” What’s most amazing about this whole epic ordeal is that it didn’t involve the Warbeasts at all, nor was the primary purpose of winning to defeat the adversary (again, this isn’t shounen). The “piece” he spoke of was Kurami Zell, along with her elf associate Feel.

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She would never trust him the way Shiro did unless he could unpack the entire width ad breadth of his existence, which he did by intentionally losing right up until the end. The two demands of his choice he asked for as the reward for victory gives him his piece: restoring each others’ memories, but keeping copies of the ones they took from one another. I’m very much looking forward to the new Kurami he made.

When the “sky walk” is over and the dust settles, Sora and Shiro and Kurami and Feel collapse into two bawling heaps of exhaustion. The extreme nature of this game served to underline how important a united front against the Warbeasts was to Sora, and how seriously he takes them as an opponent. And all of this was hidden in his monologue last week.

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