Kekkai Sensen & Beyond – 06

After sustaining a head injury when Zapp punts him into a bad guy, Leo has the same dream he always has: Michella sacrificing her sight and legs for his sake while he stands around doing nothing. We’re reminded of the prime reason Leo is in Hellsalem’s Lot: to cure her.

He shows Dr. Estevez his eyes, but neither she nor Director Grana have ever heard of a case of them being removed. It’s not a medical procedure; more a termination of a contract, which won’t come without considerable cost. Leo laments that he feels as powerless to save Michella as he was the day he arrived. Klaus told him there’s always light, but he can’t see it.

Then the magic, intensity, and downright insanity of simply living in the HSL, not to mention being affiliated with Libra, eventually restokes his hope of saving his sister, thus becoming the “turtle knight” who protects the princess in Michella’s drawings.

How specifically does he get inspired? A lockout!

While Steven is hacking computer systems to stop criminals from bringing down earthshaking beings who rain destruction upon the city, an old foe believed to have been incarcerated surfaces, and all of Libra goes out to deal with it, when only Steven was needed.

Only Anila remains at Libra HQ, and a single crane fly who had infiltrated the interior soon turns into a massive swarm, and one of them evolves into a humanoid of increasing intelligence and power. He sets Defcon 2, turning Libra into an impregnable fortress, with the bulk of Libra’s members trapped outside.

Klaus calls Yurian, a Ghostbuster-looking “locksmith” to override the lockout, but it will be slow going. Meanwhile, the team can’t prevent Chain, entering HQ in her usual way, from getting blasted by the building’s defense systems.

She’s fine, and even caught a glance at the bugs, whose leader becomes more and more sophisticated in speech as he talks to Klaus over the phone, basically saying he’s borrowing HQ until he becomes a god.

The delay of Bugman’s evolution could spell the end of the city, as a particularly large Earthshaker begins to descend, adding far greater stakes to the emergency than simply being locked out of a house when the oven was left on.

However, Klaus doesn’t panic; he turns to his training and his ability, has Yurian open the tiniest of holes in the defense system, and climbs the tower with blood pitons, using Leo’s eyes to discern when to avoid the security grid. Demonstrating he’s not quite ready for godhood, the Bugman idiotically goes outside to see what’s up and gets blood-lanced.

Steve tracks down the hackers controlling the Earthshaker and take them out before it touches the ground, saving tens of thousands. And thus, having watched Klaus not giving up while riding on his back, Leo resolves not to despair or give up on saving Michella. After all, you never know what this city will throw at you.

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Fate / Zero – 14

The Alliance to Destroy Caster’s Monster (ADCM) doesn’t net great results: Neither Saber, Rider or Lancer can cause any damage to Caster’s monster, as it possesses extraordinary regenerative abilities, like a flan that can reassemble itself faster than you can cut it up.

Archer watches the battle imperiously from above in his extremely cool aircraft, and expresses his disgust at the “mongrels” futile flailing below. Tokiomi uses all the fancy submissive language he knows to try to get Archer to intervene and bring the monster down, but after four of his swords do no more than the other attacks (and are contaminated in the process), Archer declines to sacrifice any more.

As the monster nears the shore, more and more innocent bystanders bear witness, making this an unmitigated disaster for the Holy Grail War and its backers. A pair of JASDF F-15s join the battle, but have no idea what they’re in for.

One gets plucked out of the air by the monster’s tentacles, then eaten; the second is “commandeered” by the newly-arrived Berserker, who engages in a fantastically wild yet balletic dogfight with Archer—as if possessing a fighter jet wasn’t cool enough.

Berserker’s movements are extremely chaotic and unpredictable (as are his missiles), but Archer is able to counter every attack and stay a little bit ahead, glad that someone is entertaining him.

With their Servants fighting each other instead of the monster, Tokiomi and Kariya decide to have a duel of their own, which had to happen some time.

Kariya asks how Tokiomi can call himself a father for giving Sakura away to the Matous, but Tokiomi not only carries a clear conscience, he’s delighted, for the sake of his illustrious noble family, that both of his daughters have the opportunity to become great mages who find “The Root”; never mind that only one of them can. 

Kariya is sick and tired of future generations suffering due to the cruelty and brutality of mages, so he’ll kill them all. It’s Toosaka magic vs. Matou…bugs.

Finally we have Uryuu Ryuunosuke. Good-looking, cheerful kid; would make a fine protagonist if he wasn’t also a child serial killer. As he laughs and celebrates what her Servant is serving up for God, he leaves himself wide open for Kiritsugu’s sniper round.

But wouldn’t you know it, he’s not upset about being shot in the stomach, he’s delighted as well, lamenting that “what he was always looking for” was right under his nose this whole time, in his own guts. Alas, he had to die to find “it”, and only got to enjoy the realization for a few moments before Kiritsugu takes the headshot.

For all of the flash and impressiveness of the Servants’ and their Masters’ abilities, all it took to grab control of the situation was some stealth, a rifle, and a couple bullets…if only it were that easy. Caster and the monster don’t vanish immediately following Uryuu’s death; and as they’ll reach shore long before they do, there’s a real possibility they’ll be able to “feed” on the gathering crowds, sustaining physical form from the absorbed mana.

Uryuu may be gone, but to get rid of Caster’s monster, Kiritsugu knows they’ll need something only Saber has—an Anti-Fortress Noble Phantasm. The only problem is, she can’t use it with the wound Lancer gave her. In order to defeat the monster, it would seem she and Lancer must duel, and Lancer has to lose.

One Punch Man – 03

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As episode three plunges into a detailed backstory for Professor Genus of the House of Evolution, I was wondering “Hey, what’s with all the lame long-winded narration?”—only for Saitama to interrupt the narrator (the cyborg gorilla) and state the exact same thing, followed by Genos telling the gorilla to keep it to “20 words or less.” Nicely played, OPM—I learned about Genus and laughed.

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Anywho, as there’s a big sale at the supermarket tomorrow, Saitama wants to take care of Genus and the HoE ASAP, so he and Genos race to the site, throwing Genus and his many clones into a panic. They have every reason to be concerned, as when they arrive at the HoE’s front door, Genos incinerates the entire above-ground structure, along with the mountain it’s attached to, as a time-saving measure for his sale-hungry boss. Still, Saitama is a bit miffed; it’s not nice to not at least hear the villain out!

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Well below ground, Genus is still kicking, and unleashes his trump card, a highly violent, psychopathic superhuman experimentation gone wrong, Carnage Kabuto. Still, he’s the strongest weapon Genus has, and thus his best bet against the intruders. That strength is demonstrated when CK turns Genos into, as Saitama calls it, “modern art.” But as usual, Saitama doesn’t panic, or even flinch at the sight of his suddenly abstracted apprentice.

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Wanting more room to play, CK invites Saitama to a colossal white training room, a perfect pure, empty canvas against which to make marvelous artwork with their fists. But eager to prove himself, Genos rushes in first, blasting Kabuto with everything he’s got…and getting nothing but a cracked-up face and frightening afro for his trouble. Yet when Genos is out for the count and CK turns on Saitama, he squares up a devastating punch and…scurries into the corner like a frightened bug (indeed, his body resembles a Hercules Beetle).

Why? Well, Genus didn’t just make CK strong, but intelligent as well, and some instinct within him is shouting stay away from Saitama, which is actually a very good idea. It also makes CK ask how he got so damn strong, a question both Genos and Professor Genus also want to know. But they all come away deeply unsatified, since all Saitama can tell them is what he did: undergo a rigorous but not altogether ridiculous training regimen for three years, losing his hair in the process.

I like how the art style becomes more dramatic and intense as he talks not of some kind of super drug or divine encounter, but mere sit-ups, push-ups, squats, runs, and going without mod cons.

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Now not so sure he trusts his instincts, CK goes into “Carnage” mode, powering up into a grotesque, rippling purple and green hulk, brimming with confidence. But it’s CK’s big boasting mouth that gets him in fatal trouble. He says he’ll be in carnage mode for a whole week, and won’t stop his murderous rampage until next Saturday. Saitama takes that to mean today is Saturday, the day of the sale, and he’s missing it!

What’s wonderful about this revelation is how much it’s built up as some kind of fatal mistake Saitama made that relates to his powerful opponent in some way. And CK in Carnage Mode certainly looks like someone who might be able to take a punch. But no, he’s taken out in one punch just like all the others; a punch Saitama really puts his heart into, since he’s so frustrated about missing the sale, though Genos later tells him if they hurry back home they can still make it.

With CK’s demise, decades of Genus’ research goes up in smoke, prompting the professor to consider ending his work on evolution and instead start a personal training regimen. Great stuff.

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One Punch Man – 02

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The first episode of OPM was going to be a tough act to follow, no matter what, so I fully expected at least a degree of regression in the second. But while that did happen, and this wasn’t nearly as good as the first episode, it was still very good, as Saitama and the young cyborg Genos join forces…or to be precise, Saitama tolerates him being around, despite not really needing anyone to fight supervillains with.

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The two meet over mosquitos. While Saitama finds himself unable to kill a single mosquito buzzing around his apartment, Genos targets Mosquito Girl, the first “sexy” supervillain OPM has fielded (voiced by Sawashiro Miyuki, who is perfect for the role), who uses her giant swarm of mosquitoes to harvest blood from the living things around her, be they animals or people.

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She also puts up a mean fight against Genos, as the two exchange the detachment of limbs and she sacrifices her sworm to power up and start beating Genos to a pulp, until Saitama arrives, running after a mosquito with bug spray. I know this show revels in absurdity, but I would have liked a more clever reason for Saitama to encounter Genos, and Saitama’s puns (“They sure bugged out”; “Mosquitoes suck”) fell to the floor with loud clangs.

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Still, Saitama takes care of Mosquito Girl with one punch, leading Genos to want to become his disciple. Saitama invites him in for some tea once he’s repaired (apparently easy, as long as parts are available) and Genos mistakes Saitama as a fellow cyborg.

He also launches into a monologue of interminable length, which is so long and accompanied by so many still shots (though I liked the micro-story of the pillbug getting up) it stopped being funny. “Drawn-out” comedy has to be utilized sparingly and not taken too far (see a classic example here). But hey, if we were supposed to get as annoyed as Saitama, mission accomplished!

We also learn that Mosquito Girl was just one of dozens of monsters being developed at the “House of Evolution”, run by a bespectacled mad-ish scientist who has his eyes on Saitama and who induced the biggest laugh in the episode:

“Why is he naked?”
“Unknown.”
“Well, whatever.”

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The scientists sends more monsters to escort Saitama to the HoE, but they predictably fail, being one-punched one after the other. He doesn’t even let the mole get away. But what’s funny about this final act is that Genos ends up in a fight with a cyborg he suspects could be the one that killed his family, but is just a gorilla trying to sound cool, while Saitama stays buried in the ground until it’s absolutely necessary to come out because it feels so nice down there.

So yeah, another entertaining episode with some genuinely funny moments, but just not quite as awesome or hilarious as the first. Which, again, is nothing to be ashamed of.

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Kuusen Madoushi Kouhosei no Kyoukan – 01 (First Impressions)

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What is it: A combination of Chrome Shelled Regios (floating cities, giant bugs, flying battlemages) and Majestic Prince (a team of underachieving misfits with issues who need shaping up). The first episode is spent getting the group together, as former ace and branded traitor Kunata Age meets the three members of team E601, notorious as the worst in the Academy City of Mystogan, before being told he’ll be instructing them, to their shock and displeasure.

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Why I won’t be watching: There’s almost nothing remotely original about this show’s themes, setting, or characters. It’s about as predictable as these kinds of shows get, from girl-with-toast-in-mouth running into the guy resulting in inappropriate touching. What really got my goat was the fact she asked him if he thought she was flat, when she is clearly at least a C-cup.

The pseudo-Chuuni narcissist isn’t much better, and the less said about the nervous wreck that is the mousey blonde the better. The fact they all come to ridiculous conclusions about Kunata is surpassed by the utter lack of character in Kunata. He’s just sorta…around. Everyone calls him a traitor, without ever being told why, but it’s painfully clear he isn’t really a traitor.

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To its credit, the show gets off to a fast start, throwing us right into the middle of an aerial bug battle, but it’s apparent this show doesn’t have the strongest budget. But even a middling battle is better than the painfully slow remaining 9/10ths of the episode, which were just Kunata milling around bumping into the very girls he’ll be instructing.

I’m going to go for broke here and predict I won’t be missing much if I pass on KMKK, mostly because I felt like I’d already seen everything it had to offer, and in all those cases the stuff I’d previously watched was better. It wasn’t terrible, just extremely meh. It’s a big Summer. Don’t waste your time on this one!

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Baby, Please Kill Me! – 05

In which Yasuna tries to get Sonya to help her catch bugs…and gets smacked by Sonya; Yasuna and Sonya enjoy various festival activities…and Yasuna gets smacked by Sonya; and Yasuna makes puppet counterparts of her and Sonya…and gets smacked by Sonya. There’s also a cool beetle that  says “‘Sup.”

We have to hand it to Yasuna Oribe; the girl can take a punch. But all that physical punishment can’t be helping her IQ. Perhaps there’s a little masochist in her, and she longs for the back of Sonya’s hand across her face or her foot in her ribs. Or perhaps there’s something darker to it: Yasuna has started to expect abuse because she recieves it so often.

Bottom line: this isn’t a friendship. Sonya is a horrid bully who beats Yasuna every chance she gets. She is a brutal menace who must be stopped. Maybe with a ninja technique…like calling the police and filing assault charges. Ah, who are we kidding. Yasuna would be lost without Sonya. Without someone to annoy and bounce themes off of, she would surely turn to a life of delinquency and n’er-do-wellness…


Rating: 3