Adachi & Shimamura – 03 – Chipping Away

Shimamura isn’t sure why Adachi suddenly ran away from her, but it looked to her like she had something to say but couldn’t say it. Unlike Adachi, who is increasingly obsessing over Shimamura in her inner thoughts, Shimamura is more introspective about herself, whether it’s the way she keeps “having regrets” or starting to “catch on to [her] lack of interest”.

Is Shimamura naturally just not interested in anything? Could Adachi be changing that part of her? When Adachi is absent for school and doesn’t answer her texts, Shimamura heads to her house. On the way, she meets the astronaut girl without the spacesuit, who thinks it’s “fate” that they keep meeting. Thankfully the spacegirl splits—I still honestly don’t know what her purpose is—and Shimamura’s unannounced visit is rewarded by seeing Adachi in her jammies.

Shimamura agrees to Adachi’s request to go out on Saturday—though Adachi’s original intent was to ask Shimamura to formally go out with her. Unfortunately the spacegirl is already with Shimamura when Adachi arrives, and proceeds to be a glittery blue-haired third wheel the whole time. Due to her little sister-ish size and demeanor, Shimamura can’t ignore the spacegirl’s attempts to grab her attention, which means Adachi gets less attention.

Moreover, the fact Shimamura so readily engages with the spacegirl makes it seem to Adachi that she’ll “take care” of anyone small and cute—including her—without thinking much of it. Adachi is thinking very much about Shimamura and Shimamura only, yet Shimamura is cognizant of everyone she spends time with.

That leads to a somewhat dark ending where she admits she allows “pieces” of herself to chip off in an attempt to keep herself “afloat”. These are the things she should be telling Adachi! I wish spacegirl would either explain her business with Shimamura or go away and give the main couple some space.

Adachi & Shimamura – 02 – Casting Your Line, Awaiting a Bite

Adachi starts out by saying Shimamura will “always probably just be Shimamura” in her heart, as we watch her fantasy of the two of them in pure white slips, about to kiss. Back in the real world, she introduces Shimamura to Chikama Yashiro, the tiny astronaut who claims to have come to Earth to find their “compatriot”.

I’m really not sure where the show is going with this little astronaut, but she does offer sage advice to Shimamura when she needs to hear it. With life, as with fishing, sometimes you don’t get a bite, but all you can do keep casting your line and hope for a bright future. Back at school, Adachi relaxes in Shimamura’s lap, and agrees to attend at least some classes so they can both be second-years next year.

Adachi believes she met Shimamura will give her a brighter future. She loves the peaceful way she feels around her, and works up the courage not just to call her pretty, but find more ways to spend time with her. Rather than play more ping pong, they go to the mall, share donuts (and indirect kisses), and hold hands while on a walk. But their quasi-date is interrupted by Chikama seeking sweets.

Adachi has another dream of being with Shimamura all in white and kissing her before waking up and wondering why she’s having these dreams. “It isn’t like that”, she insists as she bikes to school, only to suddenly brake hard when she envisions them kissing again. And even though she’s coy about telling Shimamura where she works, Shimamura finds out anyway when she and her family go to the restaurant where she waits tables while wearing a lovely blue Chinese dress.

Adachi comes to see herself as relying on and even wanting to monopolize Shimamura for herself, or at least wants to be put first in her eyes. Shimamura in turn seems willing to coddle and spoil her, but Adachi notes that she doesn’t seem to seek anything in return.

Even so, Adachi can’t help but ask if she can come to Shimamura’s house, and of course she’s welcomed with open…legs?! Yes, seeing Shimamura reclining on a bean bag compels Adachi to ask for something she thinks will make her seem like a “complete weirdo”: to sit between her legs. But again, Shimamura gladly accommodates her; her little sister sits like that all the time, after all.

Adachi, who doesn’t want to be thought of as a little sister, would probably be content to stay in that position and stare into Shimamura’s eyes until sundown. Unsure whether she’s merely thinking of confessing to her or actually saying the words, Adachi’s lips draw closer to Shimamura’s, on the cusp of making her dream a reality…

Alas, Shimamura asks if Adachi is okay since she’s blushing and not breathing right. So no, Adachi didn’t say she likes her out loud, and they clearly weren’t quite on the same page. Back home she’s quite frustrated by that, but the fact she got as far as she did means she shouldn’t assume Shimamura doesn’t feel or want the same things. She should keep casting her line and hoping for the best. She may get it, or not…but at least she’ll have tried.

Rating: 4/5 Stars

Adachi and Shimamura – 01 (First Impressions) – Let’s All Skip Class and Play Ping Pong

Adachi Sakura and Shimamura Hougetsu, are friends and partners in crime, skipping class to play ping pong together. The way the ball is volleyed back and forth, the subtle tapping sound it makes when it bounces, and the way it sometimes misses the table and rolls away, is all pleasantly indicative of their delicate, tentative friendship, which seems to both of them like it could easily become more, if they let it.

They first met in that disused second floor of the gym, and even though neither school nor ping pong matters that much to either of them (this is not a stealth sports anime!), when they’re alone together, being bad, nothing else matters. Where they differ is that Shimamura has two friends in Hina and Nagafuji, but the two of them are closer than Shimamura is to either, and in any case she considers relationships with others to be akin to free diving (though the ping pong metaphor was right there…)

Adachi, on the other hand, has no other friends. No doubt that’s part of what makes Shimamura feel their bond is special. They didn’t grow up together, they found one another. So when she asks Adachi if she’d rather go to class or go home together, she knows Adachi will pick the latter. Shimamura rides with Adachi on her bike, and her house is out of the way, but she doesn’t care. It was a weird, but fun day.

Their little hideout is violated when Shimamura’s friends discover them playing ping pong, and regard Adachi wearily as a class-skipping delinquent. The next day Adachi doesn’t come to school at all, and Shimamura isn’t happy. She doesn’t want to share Adachi, nor does she want to subject her to Hino and Nagafuji, who seem somehow so much more superficial.

There’s a profundity to Shimamura and Adachi’s respective inner monologues about themselves and each other that keeps bringing them together, such that when Shimamura is dejected when she considers never seeing Adachi again, she happens to appear behind her on her bike, with the lunch they would have shared that day.

Adachi is glad Shimamura was alone, which makes Shimamura elated enough to fly around like an airplane. That elation gave her wings, and the courage to act silly for a while. She may not know Adachi the best, but she knows she wants less diving and struggling to breathe, more flying.

So begins a calm, quiet, highly introspective story of two girls gradually growing closer together as they try to figure out the lives of which we’re witness to slices. In fact, A&S is such a serene, almost mousey show, it threatens to be drowned out by the bombast of louder, flashier series this Fall. It has more fanservice than it needs, and I can’t begin to comprehend what’s up with that tiny astronaut, but I for one am glad to have it.

Space Dandy 2 – 03

dandy232

“Oh shut up. If we have this, we could do this and that, and then that’ll happen, and we’ll be able to eat as much as we want.”

This is Dandy’s defense this after Meow scolds him for buying a sketchy teleporting flashlight instead of food because the lady who sold it to him was hot. It also serves as a tidy and prescient synopsis for their adventures to come, which are many in number and absolutely insane in nature. Seriously, there hasn’t been a Dandy this free-wheelingly, awesomely nutty in quite a while, and yet it all holds together quite nicely when you remember Dandy’s above line.

dandy234

Essentially, the episode is a treatise on the merits of another one of Dandy’s lines, and the title of the episode itself: “Good things come to those who wait [baby].” That applies as much to us the audience as it does Dandy, Meow, and QT, as the episode is deliberately roundabout and baroque in its storytelling, and initially quite head-scratching and surreal. For a few minutes there, we had no idea what was going on. Like Dandy’s head, we were just…watching a fish set up an umbrella and beach towel.

dandy235

From the first scene at the space mall that accentuated the crippling amount of choice was available to Dandy and Meow to the “fistronaut’s” futuristic underground city, this was also one of the more detail and vista-packed episodes of Dandy in a while, though all of its episodes are pretty intricate. The episode also had fun with physics, astronomy, and relativity, and dished out some very painterly, lyrical animation for the boat trip up the water column from Planet Pushy Boyfriend to Planet Girlfriend. Even those random names describe the planets pretty well in their way.

dandy236

There are a lot of familiar Dandyisms on display here: from Meow’s hunger leading to crazy adventures, to Dandy snatching perceptiveness out of the jaws of ignorance, to Dr. Gel almost capturing Dandy, to a hastily-told but intricate look into the worlds orbiting one of the countless stars in space. Dandy and Meow also witness a couple more ends: both the end of the short-sighted civilization of arrogant, mean-spirited, clothed fish, to the fishtronaut himself, who turns into grilled fish that is the food Dandy promised the flashlight would ultimately provide.

dandy237

Also like many other Dandy episodes, this one has high re-watch value, though there’s nothing like being blissfully in the dark and wondering precisely how (or if) the show is going to divine a coherent resolution from all the colorful chaos. And no show airing now is quite as good at bending my minds and making me hungry at the same time. If you’ll excuse me, I’m going to attempt to locate some grilled fish. The more interesting the life they’ve lived, the tastier they are.

dandy238

9_ses

Captain Earth – 01

earth11

I wasn’t originally going to give this new Bones sci-fi/mecha series a look, but then I realized I was only watching three shows to my colleagues’ four; something I’d never live down. Having recently come off of the excellent but highly un-serious Space Dandy, your classic straitlaced sci-fi procedural proved highly satisfying, especially considering how much care (and cash) went into its production.

earth12

The episode is replete with all the little design details I love, from the intricate control panels and big bold labels painted on everything, to the minimalist black-and-white bumper style informed by Eva and E-7. The central protagonist Manatsu Daichi bears a rather unfortunate resemblance to Renton, but at least he’s not nearly as annoying out of the gate. In fact, I had no trouble identifying with Daichi’s wanderlust and desire to do great(er) things.

earth13

Flashbacks are interspersed between the escalating present events, efficiently painting the picture of Daichi’s past, the legacy of his dad, and astronaut “Captain”, and the two friends he met while exploring the launch site on the island where he grew up, both of whom carry a very whimsical lab experiment bearing. We also get a slight glimpse of a “Radical Ed” like hackress. All it takes is a news report of a strange phenomenon for him to return home and check things out.

earth14

And down the rabbit hole he goes, into the cockpit of an “Earth Engine” within a rocket that launches into space and passes through three space stations that assemble a formidable, very chunky-looking mecha somewhat like Tieria’s Gundam Nadleeh. His first opponent will be (the battle doesn’t start this episode) the sexy alien Moco from “Kiltgang” (spelled “Kill-T-Gang” on displays), an organization sending AEOs (“Approaching Earth Objects”) at…Earth (duh).

earth15

Sure, long strings of dialogue discussing a whole bunch of terminology I don’t yet understand got a little tiresome, but I enjoyed the technobabble checklists the NASA-equivalent technitions run through as Daichi’s mecha is built. The promo art spoils the fact that Daichi will reunite with the two other kids he befriended, as well as the Ed-like girl, giving us a nice central quartet to work with. I’ve watched a lot in this genre, so we’ll see if Captain Earth can bring something new the table.

7_brav