Ao no Exorcist 18

Konekomaru’s fear of Rin leads him to reluctantly make a deal with a crow-like demon called Gale to kill him. Honestly I didn’t think Koneko had it in him. Frankly I didn’t think he had anything in him, since he is one of the more underused supporting esquires, although not as mysterious as puppet kid.

Here’s hoping there will be no more doubts about Rin’s loyalties. Even after Konekomaru tries to kill him more than once, and makes it look like Rin’s attacking him, all but trashing whatever trust Bon had in him, Rin still comes to Koneko’s rescue, wasting Gale and catching him in mid-air. I’ll admit I’d be pretty annoyed if Rin was my classmate, but deep down he’s a nice guy, and as he says, it isn’t like he got to choose his father.

Heck, Rin even lets Koneko save face when he finds him at a bus stop ready to quit and take off. The bald shrimp fails to realize that fear is necessary in this line of work, and while it can be used to protect you and it can work for you in other ways, it can and should never be totally eliminated. Those without any fear whatsoever are the ones who can’t be trusted.


Rating: 3.5

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Sket Dance 18

Leave it to Sket Dance to take something as innocently mundane as a board game and go totally nuts with it. The game in question is called “Hyperion”, which I’ve never heard of, but it’s used as a vehicle to riff off of dozens of franchises and genres, as well as the practice of becoming a little too obsessed and involved in a game.

This is another one of Mr. Yamanobe’s games, and since it was a board game and not anything athletic, it was definitely worth a fresh episode. He warns Himeko that girls tend not to have fun playing Hyperion…and he turns out to be absolutely right. Everything about the game rubs her the wrong way, and she’s further irritated by how easily Bossun and Switch slip into utter madness.

Yamanobe keeps the game going by making the Sket-dan trek with him out to the countryside for the world tournament, but it only turns out to be two grandsons of Yamanobe’s late mentor, Master Wang. They were just fulfilling the wishes in Wang’s will. The now cosplaying boys snap out of it, much to Himeko’s relief. This episode wasn’t without its silly moments, but it was so blissfully absurd, it worked for me.


Rating: 3

Tiger & Bunny 18

Yeah, I knew Tiger wasn’t going to quit being a hero this week and return home to take care of Kaede. But part of me still wished he did. But then it wouldn’t be Tiger & Bunny, now would it? What I didn’t expect was the tragic life story of Kriem, and how Jake Martinez saved her, as told on her deathbed.

Kaede’s powers are starting to run amok back home. It turns out she doesn’t just have Tiger’s Hundred Power. She can copy powers. Yegods, that’s an awesome power! If she can master it, what’s stopping her from moving to Sternbild to help fight crime, or at the very least, be closer to her father. I mean hell, Karina is still in high school, and she’s a hero. Dragon Kid’s just…a kid, amarite? I’m just looking for the most mutually beneficial solution here.

To be fair to Kotetsu, he never really has a good time to announce his retirement: the rest of the gang is so happy to see him back (especially the previously mentioned Karina). And before she dies, Kriem drops a bomb on Barnaby: Jake didn’t murder his parents. It’s proven when the hand tattoo in Bunny’s memory is missing from Jake’s hand in footage. This causes Barnaby to question his fitness to be a hero, at exactly the wrong time for Kotetsu. Nothing comes easy for ‘ol Tiger.


Rating: 3.5

Hanasaku Iroha 18

Nako’s the quiet, shy, nervous one, right? Well, yes and no. Turns out Nako would have preferred to be born a fish, because she prefers swimming in a sea to the ordinary human world. But she considers her home a sea, and a haven, in which to be herself. She has a big, loving family that can be a hassle sometimes.

But this “Real Nako” is loud, cheerful, and assertive. Somebody we’ve only seen in the shortest of bursts – when she rescues the author from drowning, for instance. She is also grown quite comfortable with Ohana and Minko, to the point they’re almost like sisters…almost. She’s still nowhere near as loose and free around them as she is at home.

When she recieves a considerable raise from the madam manager, she assumes it comes with the expectation she’ll improve. This comes from her father’s philosophy towards child-rearing: praise your child, and she’ll strive to improve herself to be worthy of that praise (contrast this with her mother’s more tough-love stance). Nako is aware of the disconnect between her “real” self and how she acts at the inn, at school, and anywhere else in public.

After trying in vain to “change” herself by spending lots of money on a new outfit and coming to work trying to act like she does at home, she makes a mistake that lands her in trouble. It is then that the manager tells her her raise wasn’t a challenge, but a reward, after guests wrote her a glowing report. Despite not having to change, I do hope to see a little more of that real Nako; she was way more fun to watch.


Rating: 3.5