Kabukichou Sherlock – 10 – The War They Left for Us

John Watson is haunted by the death of Irene Adler. He’s constantly looking at his forearm which she grasped with her blood-soaked hand. The blood was washed away, but he can still feel it on his skin. She tried to tell him something, but all we heard was “Jack.”

Ever since then, Watson is visited upon by a ghost—the ghost of Irene. We see her body in the morgue, so the show is pretty insistent that she is, in fact, dead. Her ghost seems to imply Moriarty did it, and Sherlock is next, but Sherlock just wants to be alone.

We spend the whole episode all swept up in Watson’s suspicions, which might just curdle into paranoia by the time he’s openly accusing Moriarty of being Jack the Ripper. Moriarty laughs it off and then shares the joke with the whole gang, but we share Watson’s continued gut feeling that something is not quite right about Moriarty.

Even when Watson chases Moriarty, who is following Sherlock and even pulls a knife menacingly, it’s Watson whom Sherlock begins to suspect. He told Moriarty about Irene’s hideout, because he believed and still believes the kid can be trusted. Compared to him, Watson is a stranger. Still raw from the loss of Irene, Sherlock banishes Watson from his sight..

While sharing another drink at the bar (Watson drinks a lot this week, adding to his unreliability), Kyougoku Fuyuto proposes a way for Watson to get back into Holmes’ good graces: unlock the USB drive and find the proof about Jack’s identity. The first warning sign is that Fuyuto “knows someone” who can crack the password, so all Watson has to do is steal it from Sherlock and give it to him.

Perhaps sobering up a bit in the process of finding the drive (Sherlock hid it in a baggie in a can of peaches), Watson also gets cold feet about handing over the drive, but Fuyuto insists…with a knife. Turns out Fuyuto is obsessed with being the one to catch Jack, perhaps out of a need to prove to Maki that he’s worth marrying? In any case, a struggle ensues, interrupted by Moriarty and Sherlock, the latter of whom thanks Watson.

Was the whole plan to expose Fuyuto’s true colors? Is Irene really dead, or was her death faked to draw out Jack? Like Watson this week, I thought I was on to something about Moriarty, but now…I’m not so sure about anything!

Shokugeki no Souma 4 – 10 – The Battle Within the Battle

The final bout is here, and Souma and Erina are forced to work together on a two-course meal. It goes about as well as you’d expect. Souma seems determined to challenge Erina at every turn, even after he lost rock-paper-scissors and got stuck with the first course. Meanwhile, Eishi and Rindou work like a well-oiled machine, and the latter presents their appetizer before the rebels even start cooking.

It’s a mushroom mille-fille using the formic acid from ants of all things to provide a unique and tantalizing tang, and it’s so delicious and well-composed, Azami’s “Gifting” ability—inherited by marrying into the Nakiri family—suddenly activates, disrobing some of the rebels (though I’m not sure why Ikumi is embarrassed, she rarely wears much to start with!)

Rindou’s dish is specifically crafted not just to show what her mastery of rare ingredients can do, but to provide the perfect preamble for Eishi’s main: a delicate yet powerful salt-crusted venison that transports everyone who eats it to a culinary Eden. It’s the ideal Azami talks about when he talks about Central, and even Souma has to admit it’s pretty powerful. But this isn’t a battle to determine whose cooking is best, necessarily, but how they come upon those flavors. It’s about the creative freedom of all chefs, not just an elite few.

As Souma cooks, he is constantly turning to Erina to taste things, tuning each of his ingredients like one would tune the strings of a guitar before a concert, “taking advantage” of her God Tongue the way her father wants to in his Central regime. His resulting dish combines two of his specialties—dishes only he could come up with—into one super-specialty that maximizes both his resourcefulness and playfulness with Erina’s God Tongue ability.

That resulting dish, “Countdown Caveman Meat, Cheeky Youngster Style”, wows all the judges and even causes another bout of Gifting from Azami, who cannot deny Souma juggled some very disparate flavors and techniques into a fascinatingly odd yet still cohesive plate. Unfortunately…it ain’t an appetizer. For one thing, the portion of meat presented is huge, and comes with a side of veggies. It appears to be its own meal, and for that reason, in this two-course Shokugeki, it gets a zero.

Everyone on both sides of the war is shocked that Souma, known for his rashness, would be so thoughtless as to sabotage the crucial final bout by failing to follow the simple rule of creating a dish that must come before another. But Souma hasn’t gone mad; he’s done this to challenge Erina one final time, when it matters most.

He tasted all of the mains she made the previous night; none of them would have beaten Eishi’s venison, because they weren’t her specialty. Souma went and created the best flavors he, Yukihira Souma, could make. Now it falls upon Erina to beat those flavors, and even overcome his un-appetizery portions, with her own gourmet specialty. In effect, Souma started a Shokugeki within the Shokugeki. If she can beat his dish, they lose. Time to put up or shut up!

Chuubyou Gekihatsu Boy – 11 (Fin) – Awakening

The schools sports and cultural clubs all defy the StuCo and meet with the members of the former Hero Club to lend them their support and to ask for assistance in the shadows. Everyone probably overdoes it with the disguises—not sure what’s going on with the black klansmen-looking dudes—but both school and town have spoken: they were better off with the Hero Club, and more than willing to accept their eccentricities in exchange for their hard work and kindness.

When the recent string of thefts and attacks leads to the postponement of visits by prospective students, the StuCo can no longer hold the Hero Club back, and they know it. Like astronauts marching towards their rockey, the heroes led by Mizuki approach the StuCo president and voice their intentions to do something. Having done next to nothing except ban their club, the prez can only let them pass.

That night the heroes stake out the location of the attacks, and find an iguana, Faust, and Benjamin, but also a fourth animal: a penguin that has escaped from the zoo. They chase it to the pool, where it has an advantage, and that’s when Mizuki decides to finally “awaken” and join forces with Yamato to unleash the half-drowned Touga’s ultimate attack. What’s described later as a freak meteorological phenomenon occurs, and the penguin is secured by the student who, as it happens, stole food and supplies to keep it happy.

The StuCo president publicly praises the heroes for their services to the school in an assembly, but they want something more than a fancy certificate of gratitude: they want their club room back, and the voices of the assembled student body demand the reinstatement of the club. Thus cornered, the president acquiesces to the will of the people (one wonders where the adults are in all of this…?)

Chuubyou Gekihatsu Boy was a quaint, lighthearted, fun and charming little show about a group of weirdo boys who are actually good people (imagine that!) and a girl who, while reluctant to be associated with them at first, is now proud to call herself a member of the Hero Club. Not much more to say about it. I enjoyed it!

RABUJOI’s Anime of the Decade – 60-51 – The Soaring Fifties

Welcome to RABUJOI’s Anime of the Decade, a comprehensive and hastily-researched list of the 100 best anime we watched from 2010 to 2019. We attempt to provide one brief statement about each show, based in some cases on very fuzzy recollection and possibly guesses. This list is final. No reviews, no appeals, and no Gintama (but only because we’ve never watched it).—RABUJOI STAFF


60. Nagi no Asukara

Fall 2013

P.A. Works’ moving depiction of two adjacent worlds—one by the sea, one under it—and one of the most complicated and compelling love polygons of the decade

59. Shoujo Shuumatsu Ryokou (Girls’ Last Tour)

Fall 2013

Austere and hauntingly gorgeous, as charming and life-affirming as it is devastatingly bleak and cruel

58. Nisemonogatari

Winter 2012

Puts Araragi’s two sisters in the spotlight, and features such memorable risque scenes as the bathroom scene, the Twister scene, and…the toothbrush scene

57. Dororo

Winter 2019

A imaginative 50-year-old tale is updated and expanded with truly powerful results. The party is ovah…

56. Kamisama Hajimemashita

Winter 2015

Before we learned about Fruits Basket, there was Kamisama Kiss, a charming and heartwarming tale of a down-on-her-luck human girl and her supernatural friends

55. Angel Beats!

Spring 2010

An early, stylish P.A. Work that explores life after death and the battle to right the wrongs of one’s life, fulfill what had been unfilfilled, and be remembered

54. Bakuman.

Fall 2010

The first part of an epic series in which young creative people take a chance on careers writing and drawing manga, just as much about their growing and evolving lives and relationships than the manga itself

53. Durarara!!

Winter 2010

The first, accept-no-substitute original that painted such an absorbing portrait of Tokyo’s Ikebukuro district, we were inspired to visit the place IRL. We found no headless couriers, but it was still pretty cool

52. Kanata no Astra

Summer 2019

Episodic space adventure anime were hard to come by this decade, but Kanata no Astra scratched that itch well, providing twist after twist to its serial arc while juggling a large cast we came to like and root for one by one

51. Chihayafuru

Fall 2011

Before Chihayafuru: What even is Karuta? After Chihayafuru: “Oh, that’s Karuta! I could never play that because both my Japanese and my memory suck!” Still, it’s fun to watch pretty young people kick ass at it