Welcome to Demon School, Iruma-kun – 01 (First Impressions)

Iruma-kun is a 14 year old boy who has a hard time standing up for himself. You see, his deadbeat parents have sell him to pay the bills. Recently, they even sold his soul to a demon. Fortunately, that demon just wants a grandson.

Unfortunately, ‘Grandpa’ is the director of a demon school and goes out of his way to skwee and show off his lovely grandson (now honor student) at the entrance ceremony. This immediately gets Iruma dragged into a duel, which he wins due to ‘infinite defensive capability’ after years of working on a tuna boat, and other traumatic things.

Iruma also pulls off this season’s second german suplex! Who knew that would be a thing in anime this fall? Regardless, this sudden turn of events is both funny and fortunate, as it prevents a female student from being injured in the fight.

Thus, having won a powerful subservient demon via his first duel, and the adoration of the student body, Iruma seems pretty set up for a season of light-hearted humor, bright colors, good enough action, and maybe even some harem building? While none of that is particularly unique, I found it charming and look forward to whatever nonsense comes next.

Fate/Grand Order: Absolute Demonic Front – Babylonia – 00 – Wishing for the Sky

Looks like I got in just under the deadline in time for episode 1 of Fate/Grand Order: Absolute Demonic Front – Babylonia, which I will review soon. I wanted to make sure to catch Episode 0 for the same reason I watched El-Melloi II Case File’s Episode 0: to gain some context so I wouldn’t be too confused when the main show commenced.

Episode 0, also titled Initium Iter or Beginning of the Journey, starts simply, with a demi-servant experiment seemingly going wrong, as the servant is only awakened within the human subject for a short time. In that time, the subject is suddenly transformed to a Shielder-type servant, and tries her best to break through the multiple bounded fields that protect the researchers.

That subject is Mash Kyrielight (Takahashi Rie), a designer baby with a shortened lifespan, and her primary physician at the Chaldea facility is Dr. Romani Archaman. Initium Iter focuses on the start of their relationship, as Romani is one of her only connections to humanity.

The rowdy servant that still dwells deep within her could make Mash a time bomb in the wrong hands, but Romani is committed not just to maintaining her physical and emotional health, but teaching her what it is to be, well, a person, not just a vessel.

When some kind of singularity is detected which will cause “the history of all humanity” to cease to exist by 2016, the Rayshift experiment is proposed and approved by the UN, and Mash leads a group of “spiritrons” whose mission is to travel to various points in history and “intervene in matters” with the overarching goal of making sure humanity has a future.

This prologue doesn’t really go into great detail about the mechanics behind this mission, and we only see various glimpses into the adventures Mash goes on, which presumably comprise the content of the main series to come. Suffice it to say a lot happens (or will happen), there’s a lot of characters involved, wearing a lot of elaborate outfits.

Romani makes Mash aware from the start that she may only last eighteen years at most, but Mash is accepting of that span, and like him, hopes to make the most of it. Eventually she is able to leave the clean room that was her world for years and walk about the Chaldea facility as a fellow researcher.

At some point, some kind of calamity befalls Chaldea, and seemingly only two people survive the devastation: Mash, and a young lad with black hair whom we see interacting with Mash as a comrade in arms, companion, and perhaps more. With that, the beginning ends, and their journey begins in earnest.

Val x Love – 01 (First Impressions) – Love is the Source

This is the story of Akutsu Takuma, who is huge and scary-looking and thus is always likened to an akuma or demon and ostracized. In reality, Takuma is just as scared of people as they are of him, and prefers to live and study alone.

And yet, after a discussion among class boys about the school’s three most beautiful girls, Takuma comes home to find not just those three beautiful girls (in the middle of undressing no less) but five other women of various ages, all of whom have the same last name Saotome which isn’t his. He doesn’t like this situation, but it’s been this way for some time.

Val x Love makes an interesting choice to ease us into its supernatural elements by first presenting everything mundanely, and offering only hints as to what the Saotome sisters really are, why they alone don’t fear him, and why Takuma has allowed them to take over the house he inherited from his departed parents.

What is prevalent throughout the episode are references to a spate of recent “suspicious attacks” that many attribute to akuma; but until one actually appears, one could imagine people were only being superstitious (if you didn’t watch the OP, that is). In reality the attacks are being caused by summoned demons, one of which Takuma encounters when he’s out shopping with the second-youngest sister Natsuki, on the orders of the second-oldest, Ichika.

The other sisters gather on the roof to watch the result. Turns out the nine of them are Valkyries of Valhalla, brought to Midgard by Odin to save humanity. Because “love is the source of a maiden’s power”, the more they are loved, the stronger they are. Natsuki was chosen by the others to level up first, and after Takuma is wounded saving her from falling debris (not the first time that’s happened), she disrobes, has him massage her breasts, and kisses him.

In a massive flash of heavenly flame, the giant akuma is utterly eliminated, and for a few moments we see Natsuki in her Valkyrie form as Siegrune, The Blade, before passing out in Takuma’s arms. This makes Takuma Einherjar (named after those who died in battle and go to Valhalla), here the lover of the nine Valkyries appointed by Odin to raise their levels.

If that all sounds like a lot of poppycock, I’m here to tell you…it’s not the worst? I was expecting more comedy from a show that had it among its genres, but it mostly arose from the fact such a large brute as Akuma is so intimidated by everyone, and yet has what in his case is a case of very-unlucky lechery. The akuma designs are marginally striking, while the action was brief but convincing. High marks also go to Technoboys Pulcraft Green-Fund, who composed all of the music.

For those who see the Valkyrie angle as just another excuse for a lame harem, consider that Takuma’s strong reluctance to have in one feels more genuine than most harem MCs. His introverted personality and public perception that constantly feed his self-loathing make him a sympathetic lead. As he is the source of love that powers the Valkyries, they too could fuel a transformation in him from someone who only hopes to become a quiet, respectable person to something far greater.

Null Peta – 01 (First Impressions)

A little girl builds a robot to replace her missing older sister. For some reason, she also installs weapons and a bamboo shoot. While ‘Peta’ does not boot up right away, she does eventually, before engaging rockets and blasting off to take Null to school.

Cute, charming, a little weird and well timed humor carries this short-format show across the finish line. If it were a full length episode, it could even be worth following. Who are Null and Peta? Did something tragic happen to the older sister? Will something tragic happen next because weapons?? (I probably won’t be watching)

Chuubyou Gekihatsu Boy – 01 (First Impressions) – Those Who are Wise Do Not Court Danger

Transfer student Hijiri Mizuki just wanted to blend into her new class quietly and make new friends. Too bad the day she transferred she has an eye infection necessitating an eyepatch. That eyepatch is a veritable target for precisely the opposite sort she wanted to be associated with: those afflicted with chuunibyou.

They include Noda Yamato, who is obsessed with superhero shows and considers himself a low-key hero. To be fair, he and his fellow members of the Hero Club are known for performing acts of kindness and assistance for people. When she can’t come out and tell the friendly class rep Wakase that she wants help making friends (and who can blame her?), Wakase sends Mizuki to their club, who make her their latest client, and she meets more weirdos.

Takashima Tomoki is handsome but only likes 2D girls. The theatrical Nakamura Kazuhiro dresses like Ikari Gendo and believes he’s the spawn of an angel and devil. Tsukumo Rei, well…aside from wearing bright clothes and cat-themed accessories, we don’t learn much about him, except that he’s by far the most standoffish.

Noda plants the seed that the others (excepting Rei) quickly adopt and embellish: Mizuki’s eyepatch is a result of her having yet to awaken the latent powers contained within, and instances of numerous projectiles thrown in Mizuki’s direction (a soccer ball, a rubber flamingo, and a shuttlecock) indicate that “the Agency” is hellbent on eliminating her before her powers awaken.

This is all delusional chuuni nonsense, but concurrent with that investigation, Noba is hard at work making hundreds of paper airplanes to launch from the roof during a school sports event, each with a call to make friends on Mizuki’s behalf. So Noba is trying to help—just in way she finds incredibly embarrassing. Mizuki also learns that Noba is popular due to his considerable sports acumen (and ability to jump from great heights without injury) and Tomoki also has lots of real guy friends.

Once she’s on the field for the sports event, the biggest object yet to threaten her, a basketball hoop, starts to come down after a gust of wind that blows up mere moments after she sneezes, unwittingly dodging another soccer ball, and her eyepatch falls off. From that point on, Noba & Co. believe she’s awakened, but the threat of the Agency lingers, and Nakamura fingering Tsukumo Rei as the mastermind behind the series of attacks. Rei, for his part, smirks as a found-out villain would.

But this is only the beginning! Mizuki didn’t get the group of friends she wanted, but they’re so damn sincere in their delusions, she actually starts to kinda-sorta believe some of their chuuni nonsense. I first heard Mizuki’s seiyu, Akasaki Chinatsu, in Kill Me Baby! a zany, rapid-fire adaptation of a 4-koma comic. In that she was usually the manic comic instigator, but here she expertly plays the exhausted straight-man.

The rest of the cast is equally game, and while their particular chuunibyou antics are nothing I haven’t seen before, I appreciated the various different styles of chuuni bouncing off each other, and the execution and attention to detail are above reproach.

If you’re kinda over depictions of chuunibyou, I wouldn’t blame you; this wasn’t on my initial Fall 2019 list for that very reason! Nvertheless, the heartening and charm-filled Outburst Dreamer Boys is a fun, breezy, better-than-average-looking show I’ll be watching more of, both to see what further antics Mizuki is subjected to, and to find out if she ever gets used to it or—lord forbid—participates in!

High School Prodigies Have It Easy Even in Another World! – 01 (First Impressions)

The seven best people in the world are Japanese high school students, which Choyoyu! desperately tries to sell us via 5 minutes of contrived intro cards before plunging said prodigies into another world via plain crash. Shortly there after, an elf french-kiss-feeds the first boy to awaken so goat milk stew. As prime minister of Japan, he takes it in stride.

Still desperate, Choyoyu! flashes forward a month to the prodigies all physically recovered and integrating into the elf-and-beastman town. Except the dialog feels like ‘we just arrived’ dialog, swerving awkwardly from exposition about seven heroes of fabled legend, to the introduction of mayo into the fantasy realm. Then the evil knights show up and are quickly defeated.

As the fourth Isekai to air this season, Choyoyu! had a stiff competition for eyeballs. Between the low energy cast, lower shelf visual style, and loveless story construction, it doesn’t have much going for it. At least the cast has working cell phones. And a nuke. So I guess that may turn into something later down the line?

Kemono Michi: Rise Up – 01 (First Impressions)

Animal lover and world-class pro wrestler Shibata Genzo is summoned to another world by a princess to do battle against the demon beasts threatening her kingdom. Little did she know Genzo would take her out with a German Suplex! He has no time for people who threaten his lovely animals!

Rise Up’s humor is charming, absurd, and expertly timed throughout. Toss an upper-shelf render quality, and the colorful cast of characters, and you’ve got a show aiming for Konosuba’s spot on my Isekai Ranked list. Will it get there? Depends how pervy it actually is under those wrestler undies!

Cautious Hero: The Hero Is Overpowered but Overly Cautious – 01 (First Impressions) – Not Entirely Disagreeable

The title kinda says it all! This isn’t a show that beats around the bush. The low-mid-level goddess Listarte needs a human hero to save the S-Difficulty human world of Gaeabrande (or Gairbrunde) from the Demon Lord. Knowing how popular the isekai genre is in Japan, she only looks at candidates from that country, and is unimpressed with most of them…until she comes upon one Ryuuguuin Seiya, who is neither a Suzuki or a Yamada.

To oversimplify, let’s call this KonoSuba in reverse: rather than the guy from another world being the narrator and providing the primary POV, here it’s the goddess, who is just looking to get ahead in godlife. She knows she’s struck gold in Seiya, but while he’s super-hot, she almost immediately realizes there’s a catch to those good looks and gaudy stats: Seiya is redonkulously cautious.

For one, he trusts no one, including the goddess who summoned him. He doesn’t trust the onigiri she worked hard to make for him unless she tries it first, and even then, he suspects they might have a slow-acting poison. He spends over a week in the dwelling Lista prepared for him, leveling up simply by working out.

Lista takes Seiya to a beginner’s town for outfitting, but he spends most if not all of the money she gives him on three sets of armor for double redundancy, as well as far more potions and antidotes than are needed…again, because he’s so cautious.

Once they’re finally out in the field, with nothing but harmless Level 1 slimes, he executes both of his special attacks over a half-dozen times even though the first attack was more than enough to obliterate the slime. All the ruckus he causes ends up attracting one of the Four Heavenly Kings who serve the Demon Lord himself; rather than face her, Seiya cuts and runs, leaving Lista to chase after him.

Seiya isn’t much more than the manifestation of the show’s title, but thankfully, he doesn’t really have to be much more than that. Listarte provides more than enough character for the both of them, thanks in no small part to veteran seiyu Toyosaki Aki putting on a veritable voice-acting clinic. She has as many voices as he has contingencies.

Add in the dynamic of an overpowered hero so dang cautious he’s his own greatest liability, and you have an isekai comedy that actually has something new to say. I’m in!

Ahiru no Sora – 01 (First Impressions)


Kurumatani is a short kid who’s mom was good at basketball BEFORE SHE DIED! (and gave him her shoes) He gets in fights he cannot win. He unintentionally becomes friends with a giant Afro-Japanese kid and becomes enemies with his new school’s basketball team. He also peeps on the girl’s basketball team while they get changed in the room next to the boys’ club room.

Yeah it’s hard not to compare it to Haikyuu, which I watched for 3 seasons. However, where AnS lacks the ‘spunk’ and energy of Haikyuu!!! AnS has good comedic timing. That said, it doesn’t contain much comedy to begin with (what with Kurumatani’s downer mom and being beaten up and all). The visual style is little gray and… well it’s a short kid wins basketball anime?

Ascendance of a Bookworm – 01 (First Impression)

Myne was a little peasant girl until she got a fever and God hollowed her out to make room for a recently deceased book enthusiast. Now Myne is a highly educated, book hungry, little girl living in a middle-ages Europe style ‘other world,’ and she JUST! CAN’T! EVEN!

While it’s kinda funny that the librarian was killed off camera by an earthquake/falling bookshelf, the whole indifference to ‘punting’ a little girl’s consciousness and New Myne’s disinterest in Old Myne’s family sorta sours the fun for me?

However, AoaB’s central failure is its utter lack of conflict. We know Myne will gain access to books – not just because, duh, anime – but because the story starts way ahead with a priest talking about her already having done just that! The fact that AoaB is a little wordy, a little slow, and the protagonist is a little hard to feel for doesn’t help. For a rebirth Isekai, I’m just not feeling it.

Afterschool Dice Club – 01 (First Impressions)


Wacky antics force the lonely girl in class to hang out with the new girl in class and learn about fun. Also Euro-style board gaming. Subject matter aside, the visuals are middle shelf and the protagonist has no agency. She’s simply dragged along by the plot and other characters because she’s there.

As for the subject matter… I play a lot of board games, including almost everything shown in the shop. However, I’m not sure I get anything out of highly detailed box shots and the friendgasmic high school girls discovering them?

Dice Club lacks a compelling story structure and protagonist. Unless you really get something out watching people play and explain board games, this is no different from any other ‘did you know’ / ‘public access’ vibe anime.

Oresuki: Are You Really the Only One Who Likes Me? – 01 (First Impressions) – Why is that Bench There?

Right off the bat, Oresuki looks good—and keeps looking good; there’s a lot of love in the animation and character design—but otherwise feels so damn boring. Ordinary high school kid narrating? Check. Childhood friend who likes him, unbeknownst to him? Check. Regal StuCo Prez who won’t give him the time of day? Check. Everyone has nicknames. Stop narrating! Show, don’t tell!

So, it’s not looking good. But then interesting things start happening. First, Regal StuCo Prez Akino “Cosmos” Sakura asks Ordinary high school kid Kisaragi “Joro” Amatsuyu out on a Saturday date…but it’s not what he thinks. When she sits him down on a bench, she doesn’t confess her love for him, but his best friend, Ooga “Sun” Taiyou. She wants him to help her go out with him.

The next day, Joro spends the day with his childhood friend, Hinata “Himawari” Aoi. She sits him down on a bench and confesses her love not for him, but for Sun! Even more hilarious, she fell in love with him at the same exact time Cosmos did—when they spotted him from opposite sides of a hall secretly crying after a big team loss.

Needless to say, Joro is pissed off; he was aware that Himawari had feelings for him, and no doubt saw her as a reliable Plan B. Instead, because he can’t resist either of the girls’ charms in the moment, he agrees to help both of them get with his best friend, whom Joro admits is quite a catch.

As all of this goes down, Joro shares his inner thoughts with us, the audience, like Fleabag in…Fleabag. And while he’s patient and dutiful to both Himawari and Cosmos as the two bomb in their attempts to naturally approach Sun, his Plan C is to help both of them and let Sun decide, and he’ll ask out whomever Sun rejects. I mean, Sun can’t date both of them…can he? (He totally can.)

But the sequence of twists in Joro’s carefully manicured bonsai of a plan for high school love is not yet finished: there’s a third bench. That bench is purchased on Amazon by the librarian’s aide Sanshokuin “Pansy” Sumireko, a girl who is quiet and meek to everyone but Joro, whom she teases and berates at every turn.

As Joro learns when she makes him sit on that third bench (to the tune of a modified arrangement of “The Imperial March”, hilariously enough), Sumireko is in love with him. Not Cosmos, not Himawari, but Pansy. Furthermore, she’s been stalking him for a while and the Joro she’s fallen for isn’t the Nice Joro he presents to everyone else. She wants Inner Thoughts Joro. Mean Joro. The Joro he only shows us, the odd slip-up aside.

Just like that, Mr. Calm, Cool, and Cynical is totally off-balance. Someone he’d never imagined would come close to liking him is the only one who likes him. Yet of the three young women, Pansy seems like the one best suited for him—I mean, she likes the guy beneath the surface! And though we saw her the least this week, I’m sure we’ll see a lot more of her, even as Joro tries to stick to his Plan C.

Oresuki starts out cliched and obvious on purpose, so when interesting things start happening and it flips the script on you not once or twice but three times, you’re that much more surprised and delighted. Or at least I was. But you don’t have to take my word for it…go watch it!

Summer 2019 Anime, Ranked.

With the exception of Fire Force’s twelfth episode, we’ve wrapped up our coverage of the Summer 2019 season, which is just as well since we’re technically in the second week of Autumn.

Between Braverade, sesameacrylic and MagicalChurlSukui we watched and reviewed eleven shows in all (plus additional coverage from Oigakkosan, not detailed here), totaling 132 episodes, or approximately 53 hours. Without further math, here’s how we ranked those shows, and why. Break out the thesaurus!

11. HenSuki

RABUJOI Score: 7.00/10 MAL Score: 6.83/10

Pros: Novel premise, colorful pastel palette, likable characters, generally witty banter, risque ecchi situations that never cross hard lines of decency.

Cons: Uneven at best animation, silly central mystery that drags on too long, “twist” resolution feels like a cheat.

Verdict: An enjoyable, fluffy guilty pleasure. I try to watch one per season.

10. Lord El-Melloi II Case Files

RABUJOI Score: 7.77/10 MAL Score: 7.44/10

Pros: Built-in goodwill from Fate/Zero, always intriguing setup for cases, sumptuous setting, production, and mechanical design, stirring score, bonkers magical battles.

Cons: Excessive magical technobabble can be exhausting, conclusions to mysteries can feel contrived/arbitrary, non-Fate fanatics will end up hopelessly lost by most cameos or name-drops.

Verdict: A pale shadow of the classic upon which it’s based, but nonetheless a fun and moderately clever detective series.

9. Fire Force (Episodes 1-11 of 12)

RABUJOI Score: 7.82/10 MAL Score: 7.75/10

Pros: Gorgeously bizarre alternate-universe setting, elegant world-building, virtuoso action sequences, powerful orchestral soundtrack.

Cons: And MC who is dull and cliched within an inch of his life, Characters who go from evil-to-good (or vice versa) at the drop of a hat, a tedious central conspiracy, the potential for character bloat, frustratingly uneven gender balance, pathetic bouts of fanservice.

Verdict: A stylish show primarily about spontaneous human combustion might’ve weathered news of the horrific KyoAni arson attack, but isn’t quite good enough to watching following into the Fall.

7 (tie). How Heavy are the Dumbbells You Lift?

RABUJOI Score: 7.83/10 MAL Score: 7.68/10

Pros: A fresh, original premise to which it remains totally devoted, marvelous comic timing in the rapid-fire, self-deprecating, fourth-wall breaking dialogue, lovable and believable MC, decent animation, one hell of an earworm OP.

Cons: Ecchi elements and a superfluous Russian chick don’t add much, some parody bits are too on-the-nose, the show loses momentum in the final couple episodes.

Verdict: The show that inspired me to get off my skinny, underdeveloped backside and actually join a gym for the first time in my life!

7 (tie). Cop Craft

RABUJOI Score: 7.82/10 MAL Score: 6.94/10

Pros: Cool reverse-Isekai-lite premise, Range Murata character design, toe-tapping OP and lively soundtrack, entertaining buddy cop dynamic, engaging fights and chases.

Cons: Lame villains, some odd narrative choices, inconsistent/unfocused direction, disappointing animation, underutilized supporting cop cast, lots of loose ends.

Verdict: A show with some good parts to work with, mostly used badly. A wasted opportunity that’s not as good as our episodes ratings indicated.

6. DanMachi II

RABUJOI Score: 8.25/10 MAL Score: 7.45/10

Pros: Appealing, charismatic characters you love to root for, amusing romantic polygons, tremendous score, superb utilization of twelve episodes to tell a variety of engaging stories with a beginning, middle and oh-so-epic end, culminating in a quiet finale that doesn’t forget its core goddess-child dynamic.

Cons: Villains’ barks prove far worse than their bites, a couple slower episodes between mini-arcs don’t really distinguish themselves, and that huge Amazoness Phryne…what the hell?! 

Verdict: After the very lame Sword Oratoria spinoff DanMachi got a proper sequel, focused on the characters we cared about, full of emotion, excitement, and good old-fashioned fantasy ass-kickin’.


5. Fruits Basket 1st Season (Episodes 14-25)

RABUJOI Score: 8.50/10 MAL Score: 8.36/10

Pros: Impeccably-rendered characters and depictions of their various psychological issues, dark and poignant flashbacks, exquisitely cozy slice-of-life, a good balance of the mundane and the mystic, and hard-hitting cathartic scenes.

Cons: Some members of the Souma family are more interesting (and tolerable) than others, but even the less interesting ones get plenty of screen time, Tooru’s saintly selflessness can wear thin at times.

Verdict: A beautifully-crafted second half that rewarded patience by delivering some of the strongest and most moving episodes of the year.

4. Master Teaser Takagi-san 2

RABUJOI Score: 8.58/10 MAL Score: 8.40/10

Pros: Truly magnetic chemistry in the central pair, Deft use of subtle facial expressions and body language in the animation, superb performances by Takahashi Rie and Kaji Yuki.

Cons: Like the first season, the various teasing games can grow repetitive, as can Nishikata’s denseness and inability to see more than one or two moves ahead, the side stories involving side characters often felt like padding.

Verdict: Continues and refines the brilliantly simple teasing formula of the first season, while ever-so-gradually blurring of the line between teasing and flirting. A sweet and touching, slow-burn portrayal of young, awkward first love.

2 (tie). Vinland Saga (Episodes 1-12)

RABUJOI Score: 8.67/10 MAL Score: 8.57/10

Pros: Flawed but rootable MC whose character is more complex than it initially seems, his multi-layered antihero mentor, exemplary action and battle sequences, powerful score, compelling exploration of the hard old world, with enticing glimmers of a brighter new one.

Cons: That said mentor would keep a kid dedicated to murdering him around so long stretches credulity at times, those battle sequences sometimes feature individuals or groups doing superhuman things that detract from the otherwise naturalistic milieu.

Verdict: While not quite as big, loud, epic, or bonkers as Attack on Titan, or Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress, Vinland Saga is arguably Wit Studio’s most balanced and human series. Looking forward to the second half.

2 (tie). Astra Lost in Space

RABUJOI Score: 7.77/10 MAL Score: 7.44/10

Pros: Very well done futuristic world- and space-building, a large-ish main cast that you steadily come to know and love, the sense of family that arises from the crewmembers’ experiences together, an optimistic spirit of exploration that isn’t constantly beset by mortal peril, creative planets and lifeforms, thankfully subverted expectations for a Lerche-style bloodbath.

Cons: “Character gets a backstory” formula to some episodes felt repetitive at times, the crew almost faces too little mortal peril considering their circumstances, they similarly rely on a lot of luck, some major plotlines and twists could have been left out and still resulted in a pretty strong show.

Verdict: Maybe the season’s biggest surprise hit, the ambitious Astra calls to mind some of the best of live-action shades-of-gray sci-fi (Firefly, Battlestar, Expanse) while maintaining an old school optimistic, exploratory outlook. It set out to do and say a lot, and was mostly successful in doing so.

1. O Maidens in Your Savage Season

RABUJOI Score: 8.58/10 MAL Score: 8.40/10

Pros: Fearlessly tackles tough social topics on adolescence, sexuality, gender roles, upbringing, and abuse, ably juggles multiple, diverse love stories and triangles at once, pleasingly drawn and animated, and despite all its serious themes, doesn’t leave out the comedy.

Cons: What seemed to be an irreversible dive into an abyss that would tear the five girls apart, they work almost everything out almost too easily for a tidier ending than expected; while the show dips a toe in LGBTQ themes through Momo’s awakening, her’s is one of the least developed arcs despite being one of the most interesting.

Verdict: A rare-for-anime honest and unblinking exploration of the awkward, painful, and sometimes savage emotional journey to adulthood all kids must face (and not always at the same speed). By the numbers, the best show I watched this Summer, and the one I looked forward too most from week to week.


Summer 2019 Big Board: