TenSura – 20 – A New World In The New World

After a massive celebratory feast in which the capital doesn’t waste a bit of the megalodons they slew last week, and a hot bath with the ladies including Milim who is soon off to meet with other demon lords and warn them not to mess with her bestie, Shizu’s lingering regret is expressed in a dream of the promise Rimuru made to her, bringing tears even to his slime-eyes.

With the latest crisis easily dealt with and a formidable retinue of powerful warriors and specialists beneath him, Rimuru now feels confident to leave his capital and head to the Kingdom of Ingrassia, where Shizu’s students still require training and guidance.

His only companion is Ranga, who gets him there in three days and then hides in his shadow. For the first time, Rimuru’s in a big human city, and is amazed by the level of tech, from huge glass windows to teleporters at the academy. It’s hardly Esthar, but it’s a definite leap from his still impressive capital.

Ther, Rimuru meets the grandmaster, a former student of Shizu’s named Kagurazaka Yuuki, who sees Shizu’s mask and initially considers Rimuru a threat. They exchange powerful blows that destroy all the fancy furniture in the room, but when Rimuru insists he’s not a bad slime, he learns that Yuuki is from a time in Japan not too far removed, and a ravenous otaku to boot.

The ensuing exchange of pop cultural references is an absolute delight to behold, as both of these transplants revel in the rare instance being among their own kind. Yuuki is particularly astonished that there have been nineteen Final Fantasys, that Glass Mask and The Five Star Stories are still going strong, and that the Sagrada Familia is almost complete. He doesn’t care a whit about the prime ministers, however.

Even better, Rimuru transforms to Slime Mode and converts some blank paper Yuuki supplies to print a king’s ransom of volumes he’s accumulated in his vast slime memory, while also eliciting some scolding by the Great Sage, who considers it a “waste” of her abilities when it’s actually anything but!

Gifting Yuuki such a wealth of material from his old home proves beyond any doubt that Rimuru is indeed not a bad slime, and someone who can be trusted. When Rimuru brings up Shizu’s regret, Yuuki agrees to give Rimuru a job at Freedom Academy, teaching the five young, powerful, but short-lived “Summons.”

While Rimuru is initially overwhelmed by how, er, exuberant these five kids are, you can’t help but want him to succeed in finding a way for the misfits to survive longer than five years. His capital is essentially in cruise control, with his subordinates able to handle any number of threats in his absence.

With these five, Rimuru is definitely scaling back the scope of his assistance, but this is a project only he can undertake, what with his perspective, abilities, and most importantly, his connection to Shizu. I also have no doubt we’ll be seeing Shizu’s extremely powerful former student, Sakaguchi Hinata, in due time.

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Dororo – 07 – Spiders Are People Too

In the wake of the loss of Mio and the orphans, Hyakkimaru isn’t really in the mood to talk, even though he has his voice back. In an effort to get him to cheer up, Dororo tries to tickle him, no no avail. Instead, they encounter yet another monster.

This time it’s a frightening spider woman, who is busy sucking the life out of a man she hypnotized into thinking it’s a much more pleasurable experience. Notably, the man is not dead, and once Hyakkimaru frees him, the spider woman runs off, and we later see she’s transforming into human form.

This form allows her to grab the immediate attention of the first man to come across her passed out in a bed of flowers. His name is Yajirou, and he offers his home and his food to nurse her back to health. She has no human name, so Yajirou names her Ohagi.

She’s not particularly friendly, but his human food is good, and he’s not like other humans, not even harming a cockroach in his house. He values all life, big or small. In the night, while hungry for a human snack, Ohagi decides to have more rice instead.

As Hyakkimaru and Dororo spend the next two days searching in vain for the monster they believe is kidnapping villagers in a valley quarry where life is harsh, Yajirou is worried that Ohagi is getting paler and weaker, and offers to smuggle out of the town, whose lord is very stingy about letting people leave; he’d rather they work themselves to death at the quarry, making him money. It’s another sign that war or not, life is particularly tough for the little guy in this time.

Ohagi takes Yajirou up on his offer, but they come afoul of Hyakkimaru and Dororo. To their surprise, Yajirou confesses to being the “kidnapper”—the people who are missing he helped smuggle out of the town for their own sakes. Ohagi, meanwhile, doesn’t kill if she doesn’t have to, preferring to suck just enough life out of people to allow them to revive. But the village guard shows up, ready to arrest Yajirou.

Ohagi attacks them and slips away from Hyakkimaru, for whom it’s become a habit to tear off his fake arms and attack red form in his vision. But Ohagi isn’t always red; an indication she’s not always evil or demonic, just perhaps more often than most. More importantly, she’s not trying to kill anyone, just survive, and Yajirou wants to help her.

While I thought Ohagi would eventually betray Yajirou (like the scorpion and the frog—due to her nature), my expectations were nicely subverted, as it seems theirs will be a more symbiotic relationship.

The guard catches up with them and puts two arrows in Yajirou just after Ohagi agrees to go with her and be her regular “prey.” Yajirou strikes out in anger, and Hyakkimaru once again intervenes as Ohagi takes her true spider monster form. But once again, it’s not as simple as Hyakkimaru defeating the demon and regaining a new part of himself.

Thanks to Hyakkimaru’s hearing, he can hear both Yajirou’s pleas not to kill her, and he stays his blade, allowing the two to escape without further incident. Provided Ohagi has a willing source of life force in the person of Yajirou, Hyakkimaru can be confident she doesn’t pose a threat. For once, Hyakkimaru and Dororo aren’t walking away from a complete bloodbath; there’s hope for this couple.

While we’ve had a human serving as the instrument for a demon blade, we haven’t yet had demon who wasn’t just pure evil all or all about killing. We here at RABUJOI are all extremely pro-spider. They do humans far more good than harm as devourers of house pests, and aren’t really interested in hurting us unless threatened.

Thus it’s only fitting that the first demon to have a more nuanced, dimensional character takes the form of our scary-looking but generally beneficial eight-legged friends. The final scene—in which an initially-spooked Dororo spares a spider leading to Hyakkimaru’s first laugh—was pitch-perfect. Even better than having a diversity of foes is when some of them turn out not to be foes at all.