TenSura – 19 – Rimuru Can’t Lose

Well, that was underwhelming. Sure Charybdis is huge and heals quickly, but it was never a match for Milim, while its Megalodons were nothing more than small fry plucked out of the sky one by one by Rimuru’s many subordinates.

Even compared to past foes like the Demon Lord Geld, Rimuru kinda phones it in, making me realize there’s only so many times I can watch him and his forces win easily before the formula becomes stale and boring.

The only hiccup in this episode is that Rimuru thought Charybdis was coming for him, when it really had its eye on Milim, since deep within its carapace lurked a very pissed-off Sir Phobio.

But all this really means is Rimuru wastes the better part of an afternoon halfheartedly hacking at the boss before sending in Milim, who was on the sidelines the whole time begging to be let in on the fun. Milim barely has to rub the sleep from her eyes before Charybdis is nothing but a cloud of dust. Her biggest challenge was showing enough retraint to not kill Phobio.

Rimuru removes Charybdis from Phobio and heals him, then Demon Lord Carrion arrives to punch him anew and then take him away. For his part Phobio is foolish and contrite, and can’t believe Rimuru is so merciful. Throughout all of this, Rimuru just kinda shrugs everything off as “alright, that’s over with” and moves on to the next potential challenge: those annoying harlequins.

We’re constantly reminded in the OP: the only thing Rimuru ever lost in this world was Shizu, and even she’s somewhere inside him. I’m here to say that yes, I am tired of all the winning, especially easy winning. If there’s never going to be any chance of Rimuru losing anything or anyone else of value, it’s going to be a long final five episodes.

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Dororo – 06 – Not Everyone Can Get It All Back

Anyone who thought things were going to work out with Mio and her group of orphans has not been paying attention: Dororo is about people losing more than they can bear and trying to press on, but not everyone gets to survive. Some, like Mio and the kids, become another loss for our protagonists, who are cursed with the luck of survival, and with bearing witness to those who aren’t so lucky.

Dororo may have stumbled upon what Mio is up to all night, but Take is still blissfully unaware, and Dororo keeps it that way. Take, like Mio, dreams of the day they have the money to plant a rice paddy that will be green in spring and golden in the autumn. It’s what keeps them going, and it no doubt prompts Dororo to wonder what keeps him going.

At Casa de Daigo, Tahomaru urges his father to let him fight in the army. His head is full of steam and dreams of making his parents proud, but both father and mother forbid his demand, because they know all too well how easy it is to lose your life, no matter how good at martial arts one may be.

Tahomaru takes out his frustrations on his mother, who he’s suspected for some time loves and cares about something more than him. He knows he was childish to guilt trip her, but he’s continually vexed by the mystery of who or what dominates his parents’ thoughts. If he and Hyakkimaru ever meet, it’s not going to be cordial.

Dororo and Mio have to watch Hyakkimaru like a hawk from going back to fight the antlion demon while his leg wound is healing. Mio is eager to hear the voice Hyakkimaru gained , but he only wants to hear her song, which she says she sings to forget the pain. She lives with the pain of both everything she’s lost and what she must deal with nightly.

She worries her soul looks “filthy” to Hyakkimaru, but we can see through his eyes and it’s not; she’s being far too harsh on herself. Dororo also admits after his initial reaction that Mio is only doing what she must to survive. He tells her his mother never did what she did, and she died for it.

But unlike Hyakkimaru and Dororo, Mio doesn’t get to survive anyway, despite going to such lengths. Daigo’s soldiers catch her working on both sides of the conflict, which was always a risk too great no matter the reward, and they punish her by killing her, slaughtering the orphans, and burning their temple shelter.

Worse still, Hyakkimaru’s need to finish his fight with the demon draws him away at the worst possible time. He successfully defeats the demon, and the leg it took from him last week is fully restored. But it wasn’t worth it. I will miss Mio terribly; Mizuki Nana really brought warmth and empathy to her role, but she was just too good for this world.

When Hyakkimaru takes out his hatred for the soldiers and anger at himself for not being there when it mattered, it is a terrifying sight to behold, and almost verbatim what Biwamaru had feared: that the beast that emerged from the cave would be a monster. He doesn’t just quickly, cleanly kill the murderous wretches, he evicerates them, ignoring their pleas for mercy.

Dororo manages to stop him from killing the last man, who escapes and will probably report Hyakkimaru to Daigo, officially ending his time in the shadows and putting him squarely in his father’s sights. That may end up being a very bad idea, but Dororo had to stop him from killing everyone, lest the darkness consume him. He shows Hyakkimaru the bag of rice seed Mio finally got for her services.

She was on the cusp of achieving her dreams and those of the orphans, but their idealized future was never going to be safe in this harsh brutal land of warring factions, whether Hyakkimaru stayed to protect them or not. He couldn’t be a hero to Mio and the kids. All he can do is accept his luck, keep surviving, keep fighting the demons both outside and within, with Dororo making sure to serve as a conscientious check when his aniki’s pain threatens to explode.