Mahoutsukai no Yome – 11

Lindel’s fireside infodump-er-saga with Chise continues as he recounts his early travels with his new apprentice Elias. While making a house visit to heal a sick child, the child’s sister has “the sight” and spots Elias in Lindel’s shadow.

The girl assumes it’s an evil demon, and before long the entire village is mobilized against Lindel and Elias. When Lindel is injured by a thrown rock, Elias loses his temper and attacks the villagers with his thorny vine appendages, basically confirming their worst fears.

And here is the start of the trouble with Elias Ainsworth that I’ve had for the past ten weeks; a problem no closer to being solved in its eleventh. As Lindel’s master noted, he has a tiny amount of human in him, but there just isn’t enough humanity for me to fully emotionally connect.

That’s made any exploration of Elias and Chise’s relationship—in terms of her status as his future wife—feel incomplete and unsatisfying. As Lindel said to Chise, Elias “seemed to be missing something”, and for me, he’s still missing it.

(There’s also the little matter of Elias having a vague memory of—and occasionally feeling the urge to—eat humans, though Chise claims she’s never once feared Elias, even during that tense bed scene.)

But perhaps I’m not being open-minded enough with the premise that it isn’t that Elias isn’t human enough, but that for all the years he’s lived, Elias is still a child, and not just in Lindel’s eyes.

As a child, he’s insecure, emotionally stunted, and prefers the shadows. Chise, with her own stunted childhood, is in a similar state, leaving us with two would-be “lovers” who really have no clue what they’re doing.

A large part of that is neither Elias nor Chise have really taken the time to dig that deeply into who they are and what they want, aside from the big things like “survival” and “being wanted/needed”.

But never mind that for now; we’ve got a long way to go with these two crazy kids. For now, Chise gets tossed back into the water by baby dragons, meets a leviathan (neat!) and then sets to work whittling down a wooden log into her wand, which is meant to be an introspective process.

When night falls, Lindel, AKA Echos, sings the song of a hundred flowers, and all number of magical beings emerge and join in a dance. Chise dances for the first time, and then inadvertently opens a “water mirror” through which she can communicate directly with Elias.

Chise says Elias “looks troubled”, which is a bit silly since his bony face never really changes that much, and then the two remark at how much they miss one another, despite not having been apart all that long.

Home is cold without Chise, and Chise wants to show Elias the beautiful scene Lindel has created. “Two kids”, as Lindel said, both trying to figure out who they are and what the other person means to them.

And since Chise has learned so much about Elias—things he couldn’t or wouldn’t say—she wants to reveal to him more about her self; something she hasn’t yet been able to do to her satisfaction.

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Kekkai Sensen & Beyond – 11

After Skypeing with William Macbeth, Leo calls his sister for the first time in a blue moon, and three words from her turn his world upside-down: “I’m getting married.” It’s so sudden, and yet he contacts her so infrequently it’s only natural he’d miss out on the details of her relationship leading up to her engagement.

Michella is also on her way to Hellsalem’s Lot, and arranges for Leo meet her and her new fiancee at their hotel. Leo is there, but he’s nervous. Is this new man going to supplant him as Michella’s knight? Much of Libra shows up to guard Leo, though perhaps they just want to sneak a look at some Watch sibling love?

Leo and Michella’s reunion is simple but moving. Leo’s introduction to her fiancee, Toby McLachlan, is also very straightforward, as is the inevitable twist that he’s not human. Or rather, his body has been possessed by something not human.

Maybe those other Libra folks showed up out of pure instinct, since the only person who can see the monster attached to Toby is Leo, with his All-Seeing Eyes of the Gods. But here’s the kicker: the monster, one Doctor Gamimozu, has an All-Seeing Eye of his own.

He assures Leo that Toby isn’t being harmed, and that Michella won’t be either. But still, it’s hard to trust a guy hiding from everyone else, and who seems to admire Riga El Menuhyut, the “ophthalmological engineer to the eminent” who gave Leo his eyes and took Michella’s sight.

The not-so-good doctor is surveying all of the Prostheses of the Gods, and I guess he figured the best way to look at the one with eyes observing human history’s greatest event—Hellsalem’s Lot—was through Toby. Interestingly, Toby still has a degree of autonomy; he’s not a fake person, and his love for Michella seems genuine.

As amusingly demonstrated by Zapp telling Leo he needs to head off to his love shack, none of the Libra members sense any threat, so when an emergency call for a nasty mindless blood breed goes out, they mobilize to relieve the cops, and Leo’s services are needed as well.

Steven, Zapp, and Zed are able to incapacitate the breed, but they and Klaus need the creature’s true name in order to seal it. That’s where Leo comes in, though with Gamimozu watching his every move via mini-drone, Leo isn’t happy about revealing what he does to the doctor, nor does he appreciate the patronizing praise.

But Gamimozu isn’t just here to observe at a distance. He wants to possess Leo, the consequences of which I don’t even want to ponder. In a nicely-placed flashback to young Leo and Michella drawing in her room, Michella tells basically the same tale unfolding in the present. But when Leo asks her how the “warriors” will deal with the hidden “ghosts”, Michella replies “I don’t know. How should he?”

The odds are certainly against Leo, what with Gamimozu’s ability to see as much as Leo can, his being totally hidden from the other Libra members, possessing far superior strength to Leo, and oh yeah, the fact both Toby and Michella are one stray blade away from losing their heads. “How should he”, indeed.

3-gatsu no Lion – 32

Perhaps I denounced Junko for playing dirty against Nikaidou; turns out he respects the hell out of the round little guy, and was fully prepared to lose to him…until Nikaidou collapsed.

Between his clueless drinking buddies with their boorish questioning, his two downgrades, and losing his prized racing pigeon Sliver, we see that Junko’s loss to Rei is only the latest of many setbacks in his personal and professional life.

However, things look up after he sends hydrangeas to Nikaidou. Silver also returns, and with it, Junko’s fighting spirit, which he aims to use in the 12th Lion King Tournament.

While ostensibly a detour from the season’s main narrative of Hina’s predicament, it’s still an enjoyable and at times moving character study.

Back to Rei, who celebrates his Newcomer victory by treating the Kawamotos to anything they’d like at a sweet shop.

Akari and Hina end up scaring both Rei and Grandpa by managing to put away prestigious amounts of delicious dessert in complex combinations of texture, temperature, and flavor.

By the time they leave the restaurant, the girls can barely move, and Momo, in classic kid form, waits until they left the nearest restroom to declare she had to pee.

With Akari unable to exert herself too much, Rei carries Momo, while Hina stays by his side. Akari notices that ever since Rei visited Hina in Kyoto, she’s been smiling a lot more.

We flash back to their encounter by the river, where Rei is so kind and accommodating, Hina feels as if she’s back home. Rei and Hina are lovingly framed an rendered in this scene, looking for all the world like a romantic pair, particularly when Hina tries on Rei’s glasses.

But whatever the vibes they emit, Hina has been thoroughly cheered up, to the relief of both Akari and Gramps.