Joukamachi no Dandelion – 11

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With only a month to go before the election, the Sakurada siblings watch the latest polls, and the question of why Akane is so scared of crowds and attention comes up. Her older siblings recall that she wasn’t always so shy in public; quite the opposite, and thus we enter a flashback with that bold, courageous Lil’ Akane, obsessed with spreading justice throughout the land (perhaps influenced by comic books).

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Her confidence in and ease with which she wields her powers leads to her ditching her guards in order to hang out at her best bud Karen’s house, only to encounter two burglars tossing the place. The two girls are paralyzed at first, but Akane gathers her courage and uses her powers to foil the bad guys in a Home Alone-style action scene.

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Then the bad guys take the kid gloves off and threaten to hurt the girls, at which point Akane has no choice but to go a little overboard, scaring the burglars into submission, but destorying Karen’s house in the process. The gathering crowds around the site, with all the opinions and judgements flying as Akane stands holding a thankful Karen’s hand tight, gradually overwhelm her. It’s an ordeal that informs how she reacts to being in the spotlight to this day. But as Kanade said early in the episode, she had some stuff in the past that she managed to deal with; so can Akane.

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Her story is carried into the second segment as she gets the opportunity to overcome her shyness once and for all (or, at least, partially). That’s because their dad the king is in bed with a strained back (much to their mom’s chagrin), and the Sakurada princes and princesses must work together to accomplish all the official duties he’s unable to.

Akane initially helps out saving various people at a town that was hit by a landslide with her powers under the bespectacled guise of Scarlet Bloom, but she gets so into her good deeds, she doesn’t realize she loses her “Jamming Glasses” (which we know don’t really do anything) and is recognizable to all as Princess Akane.

She then remembers Karen remarking on that day she saved her from the burglars. Sure, there was some collateral damage, but that didn’t mean anything to Karen or presumably her folks, because Karen was alive and okay thanks to Akane’s heroism. So she can hold her head high—as herself, not Scarlet Bloom—as the election approaches. Because far more people like her than don’t.

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Joukamachi no Dandelion – 10

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Hikari remains not-my-favorite Sakurada, but her half of the episode benefits not only from Sacchy, who has some hot takes on royalty (they don’t understand true hardship; they’re set for life no matter what), unaware her fellow idol is in fact a princess. Akane is also cleverly brought into the storyline, since she’s such a huge Sacchy fan and is (slightly) aged up by Hikari to serve as a substitute assistant. Then Sacchy learns the truth—accidentally, creating fresh tension.

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Hikari’s manager wants her to reveal her true identity after the next joint concert with Sacchy, but Hikari decides not to do so. Now, in the past, this might seem like backtracking on the original plan to increase her exposure to the voters through idolling. But she feels to do so now would be unfair to “Raito”, and more importantly Sacchy and her fans. Still, she wants to tell Sacchy the truth before they take the stage, and she does.

Sacchy doesn’t care which identity Hikari chooses; she knows she’s a hard worker and someone she wants to keep performing with. Akane is inspired to see how much her little sis has grown, and a little envious she knows what she wants to do (outside of becoming king) and is going for it with everything she’s got.

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The second half is arguably a far simpler story, focusing on the twin siblings Shuu and Kanade. Just as the first half was a callback to a previous Hikari-Sacchy segment, the second is a callback to Kanade’s feelings of grief, regret, and idebtedness for injuring her brother by recklessly using her powers as a youth. When she sees him on the street with his girlfriend, she re-resolves to become king so she can heal his legs.

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Then, all of a sudden Shuu teleports before her, knows she’s troubled by something (they are twins after all) and tells her…he doesn’t want her to become kind just to heal his legs. He’s happy with his life, and Kanade doesn’t own him anything. Kanade’s personality is much like her power: transactional, so she can’t easily accept Shuu’s position. It just doesn’t make sense to her. Frustrated, she runs off, and nearly falls victim to an anime classic: the Bundle of Heavy Pipes Precariously hanging over the street above her.

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It’s almost history repeating itself: Shuu getting hurt because of her, but both of them are fine, as he teleports the two of them to safety. Kanade, in Shuu’s arms, is still frustrated, but Shuu reiterates, thirty seconds or no, he’s her BIG BRO, and it’s his goddamn job to protect her, no matter what happens to her. It’s her job, as his little sister, to shut up and let herself be protected. Kanade lets Shuu carry her home, and tells him she’ll no longer try to become king just for his sake, but for hers…so she can build a despotic state she’ll rule, like, well, a king!

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Akagami no Shirayuki-hime – 11

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I was hoping something substantial would come of Zen’s stolen kiss in the watchtower last week (God, that just sounds romantic), rather than serving as a tease. I was hoping that kiss would start something that couldn’t be undone. This week, AnS’s penultimate episode, confirmed those hopes and then some with the loveliest, most upliftingly romantic outing of the show, that looked every bit as good as it felt to watch.

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It starts off with a speechless, stunned Shirayuki. Zen’s warm words of concern and his kiss have lit a fire in her heart, one that burns with a brightness and heat she didn’t know was possible. She’s got it so bad, she finds it difficult to even look at Zen, which obviously causes him to worry. Fortunately for both, Zen must off to Kihal’s island to negotiate a deal for the messenger birds. As Zen’s absence makes her heart only grow fonder, Shirayuki has at least a little time to process her feelings and figure out how to form a proper response.

While away, Zen shows the island elder’s he’s not a shitstain like their Viscount and impresses some kids, but while Kihal seemed especially nervous to travel with Zen, the two are never alone, dashing any possibility of a side-romance. As for Obi, he not only takes up an interest in Shirayuki’s herbalism, but also wants to help sooth her heart, which he suspects is troubled by something Zen said or did.

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He’s about to take her hand to comfort her when Zen re-appears, saying he’s right on schedule but still shocking both Shirayuki and me with the promptness of his return, just when Shirayuki was seeking someplace to think in solitude. Obi gives her one last assist by urging her to run into the forest. It turns out to be an assist for Zen as well, as he’s able to follow her into the forest to talk.

Once he actually gets her to stop running and look in his general direction, they simply walk around, enjoying the forest breezes, and end up in the same spot Zen once hung out with Atri; a place he’s been uneasy returning to since, but feels totally at ease thanks to Shirayuki’s presence.

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The opportunity for Shirayuki to tell Zen how she feels is here, and she doesn’t waste it. She tells him she loves him in addition to him being very dear to him and wanting to be his strength; her concern is whether it’s really alright to feel that way and look that way at Zen, to which the answer is obvious, since we’re in Zen’s head as much as we’re in hers.

Just as he lit a fire in her heart, she did the same to him, and he finally knows that there is someone out there who truly needs him, and doesn’t just go along with his wishes because he’s the prince.

The lighting, the music, the close-ups, and the gentle, precise animation as the two lovers draw closer together and finally kiss again, making official what had been an informal truth for some time; it’s all superb. As for Hayami Saori, it’s her best scene since Hatoko’s Rant in InoBato, though truly, she’s been on a roll all Summer with her work as Shirayuki.

I also appreciate that the mutual confession is now taken care of with an episode to spare, in order to bask in the afterglow, so to speak. Hopefully, Shirayuki can avoid getting kidnapped one last time!

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Weekly OP: Sore ga Seiyuu!

(Sorry for the chipmunk effect from the higher-pitched music and lack of subtitles in the video above; it’s not our video.)

Gonzo’s Sore ga Seiyuu! may not be the Summer’s most popular anime (or even the  seventeenth most popular), but it does have one of the stronger OPs of the season, for three main reasons:

A.) It’s extemely on-point, as the lyrics were written specifically for the show, and it’s sung by all three titular seiyu whose lives the show follows;

B.) It’s extremely fun and catchy, starting out cutesy, but quickly taking on the verve and vigor of an action-paced shounen (or in this case, shoujo) anime; and

C.) features the three seiyu reciting the Japanese tongue twister about plums and peaches, “sumomo mo momo mo momo no uchi!” The visuals, in which the three girls describe their lives and then embody the characters they voice.

Here’s the full-length live-action music video: