Inu to Hasami wa Tsukaiyou – 04

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Harumi’s sister Madoka captures him and addresses him as her brother, but otherwise she can’t hear him speaking. When she steps out to buy pickles, he is rescued by Natsuno, who vows to make Madoka pay, until he tells her she’s his sister. When they investigate the burnt remains of an Akiyama Shinobu book in the park, Madoka confronts them, but Natsuno and Harumi escape. Later that night at her place, Harumi surmises that Madoka is the slasher, attacking anyone associated with books by the author that “stole her brother.” Madoka crashes through Natsuno’s window and grabs Harumi once more.

Whenever Madoka used to speak with her brother (whom she clearly loves very much; probably way too much), apparently all he’d talk about was Akiyama Shinobu, even lending the books for her to read. When Harumi suddenly died, we’re supposed to believe Madoka finally snapped, and she decided to fixate on Akiyama as the subject of her rage. So she’s going around town burning his Akiyama books and cutting anyone she sees with the book on them, believing his devotion to Akiyama is what did him in. That’s a pretty random, far-fetched line of reasoning, but at the end of the day, she’s not wrong: Akiyama Shinobu did kill her brother; just not the way she thinks. His obsession for her books had nothing to do with it.

Rather, the fact that Akiyama herself (AKA Natsuno) simply sat there while a shotgun was pointed at her, forced Harumi to literally take a bullet (or rather, a cartridge) for her. Mind you, he didn’t know she was Akiyama at the time; it was just a coincidence. If Madoka actually knew that’s what went down – that Natsuno’s inaction got him killed – she’d have a legitimate reason to be mad. But for a character we don’t know to suddenly go insane and start cutting people, unaware of Akiyama’s true identity, because of one out of the hundreds of authors her brother read? It’s pretty darn thin. Then there’s the little matter of why she thinks this little Dachshund is her brother, despite the fact she can’t hear him talk. Is it just because he took the Akiyama book bait? Is it, again, because she’s INSANE? Or…is it because a wizard did it?


Rating: 5 (Average)

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Kami nomi zo Shiru Sekai: Megami-hen – 03

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On the third day of his search for the remaining goddesses, Keima attempts “leaving school” scenarios with his five former conquests, with the aim of raising their affection for him by five points apiece. Circumstances such as bad weather and their unpredictable actions make it more difficult for him. Still, with Haqua, he is able to raise affection in all five, but he still has much work to do. Meanwhile, Elcie and Haqua’s co-worker Nora arrives, with a new confidential mission for Elcie to commence searching for the goddesses.

A lot has been placed on Keima’s plate; the one used to dealing with one conquest at a time is now facing a real-life equivalent of five dating sim conquests (not counting Kanon or Tenri) all existing in the same game by some kind of glitch, only a life is on the line, and potentially much more than that, as this episode implies. Still, despite his increased workload and exit from his comfort zone, so far you couldn’t ask for a more capable individual to get the job done (i.e. locate the goddesses) than Keima. He’s so well-versed in both fake and real romance (and multi-tasking) that he’s able to juggle five very different girls this week.

Fortune both smiles and frowns upon Keima at different times this week, and there are many close calls that could undermine everything. Keima couldn’t walk Tsukiyo home because she takes the bus; it was hard to get Ayumi and Chihiro separated because of an unexpected third wheel; and Yui (truly a wild card) seems more interested in conquering Keima than letting him conquer her. And speaking of wild cards, Keima and Haqua must now deal with Nora. But most impressive was how Keima handled Shiori: Haqua lured her away so her could read her story, which proved that she remembered his conquest of her. This led to an enormously entertaining collaborative writing exercise.

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Rating:7 (Very Good)