Kamisama Hajimemashita – 05

The thunder deity Narukami pays Nanami a visit at school, offering to take the shrine and Tomoe off her hands. Nanami declines, so she takes her deity mark and turns Tomoe into a child with the hammer Daikokuten. She runs into Kurama, who lets her crash at his place. Tomoe’s body is too small to handle his demonic power, and he is disgusted by his uselessness helplessness, so he goes back to the shrine and hides there. Nanami bets that if she finds him, Narukami will return him to normal. She finds him in Mikage’s mirror, and Narukami withdraws. Nanami returns Tomoe to normal and he kisses her, resuing their contract.

The florid narrator says it all this week: severe storms lie ahead for Nanami. Narukami swoops in, and in less than eight minutes Nanami is out of house and home, has no familiar, and is no longer an earth deity. We had no idea it was so easy to strip her of her godhood, but the thunder deity is as powerful as she is impatient. It’s rather amusing that she just found out Mikage’s been gone for twenty years, and wastes no time taking over the shrine. Only once she has it, she’s miserable, because the place is a run-down mess without Tomoe, who has no intention of being her familiar.

If it wasn’t for suddenly bumping into Kurama (convenient, that), Nanami would’ve likely had to spend the night out on the street. Kurama for his part almost seems to relish hosting her and lil’ Tomoe, despite his veneer of annoyance and put-outness. It’s his chance to show Nanami – deity or not – that he’s not merely a villain. But most importantly, the ordeal switches Nanami and Tomoe’s roles for a week: she proves to him she can protect and care for him in his moment of vulnerability. There were moments when he was about to lose hope, but she pulled him out of that mirror and resolved the situation. He wastes no time re-contracting (kissing) her to show his gratitude.


Rating: 7 (Very Good)

End-of-Month Rundown – October 2012

October has been a fairly active month for RABUJOI, in that it’s seen the addition of the new RTI rating, anime Trope Charts, and colorful Character Organizational Charts. On top of that, we’ve been following ten Fall series plus two Summer carryovers. It’s been a great Fall so far, with plenty of engaging action, powerful drama, touching romances…and TANKS.

12. Muv-Luv Alternative: Total Eclipse – 17/24 (5.570), (.72 RTI) – Another lull in the Beta action has meant more time for girls to fall for Yuuya…yippee.

11. Girls und Panzer – 4/12 (6.000), (.40 RTI) – We’re surprisingly into this. It’s got girls who live on giant city-ships careering around in frikkin’ tanks. What more could you possibly ask for?

10. Btooom! – 4/12 (7.000), (.44 RTI) – Like many of Madhouse’s darker works, this is building a great, tense atmosphere with diverse characters helpless against a higher power that seeks to use them as game pieces.

9. Jormungand: Perfect Order – 16/24 (7.000), (.28 RTI) – Another arc, another badass chick. Next arc: Tojo gets something to do.

8. Chuunibyou demo Koi ga Shitai! – 3/12 (7.667), (.44 RTI) – Very fun and quirky series that looks great, especially when portraying the over-the-top fights in its characters’ imaginations.

7. Sword Art Online – 17/25 (7.750), (.64 RTI) – Transitioned nicely from the first game to the real world and now a new game, but we’re disappointed Asuna is currently nothing but a plot device, replaced by an imouto (really a cousin) who has fallen for Kirito. New villain’s a bit dull, too.

6. Kamisama Hajimemashita – 4/13 (7.750), (.48 RTI) – We like the growing bond between earth deity-in-training Nanami and her fox familiar, Tomoe, as well as the diversity of their exploits thus far.

5. From the New World (Shin Sekai yori) – 5/25 (8.000), (.36 RTI) – After lots of exposition this series probably has the richest (and most effed up) setting, with kids in genuine danger having stumbled upon secrets they weren’t supposed to hear. It’s on the rise.

4. Tonari no Kaibutsu-kun – 4/13 (8.200), (.40 RTI) – Haru can be a spastic sonofabitch, but Shizuku is gradually taming him, and the two have great chemistry.

3. K – 4/13 (8.250), (.60 RTI) – There’s a crapload of factions and players and agendas – like Durarara!! – all living in a gorgeously-rendered Tokyo that really feels alive and accompanied by a sweet slick soundtrack.

2. Sukitte Ii na yo. – 4/13 (9.000), (.36 RTI) – Lots of similarities to Tonari, but this is the better shoujo romance series so far, as the male lead is less abusive/more nuanced. Both Shizuku and Mei are tough cookies, though.

1. Zetsuen no Tempest – 4/- (9.000), (.56 RTI) – Our favorite Fall series by a hair – two high schoolers getting embroiled in the middle of a magical clan war seeking revenge (or not) for the girl they both loved – one because she was his sister, one because she was his lover. Bones at its best. We wouldn’t mind a second cour.

Jormungand – 16

Kasper, Chequita, and his team are in Jakarta, attempting to meet Colonel Nualkhair, but they’re stood up. They go to a hole-in-the-wall restaurant where he laments that a “phantom company” is trying to edge them out of southeast Asia. He orders an assault on Nualkhair’s son’s compound, which is made to look like an accident but will be seen by the phantoms as a declaration of war. The company based in Japan, which is where Koko and her team are headed. During the flight, Jonah reminisces about his previous life. They meet up with Kasper’s team at Narita, and Kasper takes Jonah to see his three orphaned friends at an international school. Kasper asks to speak to Tojo, who once worked for the Defense Intelligence HQ or SR Squad, whom he believes to be the “phantoms”.

With R and Hex dead and Bookman currently hand-less, HCLI moves on to other things, as they’re threatened to be pushed out of SE Asia by a mysterious company that’s messing with their would-be clients. Kasper, who is essentially a beefed-up, more ruthless version of Koko, isn’t going to take it sitting down, and seeks the wisdom of another one from Koko’s team, Tojo. Both teams are so eclectic in their composition, it’s not surprising that they all may have past connections that may prove useful. Tojo is more brains than brawn in ops, so we may be in for a more cerebral arc than the one with R and Hex – though the tidy raid on Nualkhair’s pad was a powerful statement that Kasper doesn’t play around.

This episode was a little weighed down by frequent flashbacks that amount to clips from the first cour’s fifth episode, chronicling how Jonah ended up with HCLI and Koko. This smacked of recapping, which we never like to see in regular episodes. The clips didn’t really reveal anything new, but only served as a large, padded segue to Jonah asking Kasper about the kids he promised would be cared for in Japan. He sees them, and their clean clothes smiling faces are a striking contrast to the abject misery of that wretched base. But Jonah just sees them; he doesn’t meet them. He’s almost confirming that he deems his existence incompatible with normal life and other kids in particular. He couldn’t bear it if the sight of him changed the look on their faces from contentment to fear.


Rating: 6 (Good)

Girls und Panzer – 04

The friendly between Oorai and St. Gloriannas begins with a simple baiting tactic Darjeeling easily sees through. Her counterattack causes Team D to panic and abandon their tank and Team E loses a track. Miho orders C and D to fall back and re-engage the Brits downtown where they use stealth tactics, and Miho even has Darjeeling one-on-one at point-blank, but the Churchill’s superior armor wins the day. After losing and performing the Anglerfish Dance with Team E, Team A shops around town. They bump into Hana’s mother, who faints upon hearing she has joined tankery. Hana refuses to budge, and her mother disowns her. The girls recieve tea from St. Gloriannas, a symbol that they were a worthy opponent. They enter the national tournament.

This week the show about teenage girls battling in tanks who live on giant city-ships goes for realism: that is to say, when it comes to the ultimate result of the Oorai Tankery Club’s fist match. It leaves victory in reach as long as it can, but ultimately St. Glorianna’s prevails, as it should have. It’s a hell of a fight, though, with tanks darting all over the place. We’re still not clear how this is at all safe (especially when the tanks start doing real damage in the town), but…who cares! As Miho continues to improvise ways to keep her chances alive, Darjeeling gets more competitive, even spilling her black tea – something she promised she would never do! Still, training, discipline, experience and armor win out over rawness, pluck, luck, and a commander still finding her footing.

The tank battle never lags, and as we said, had our belief in the underdog’s defeat suspended. But surprisingly, the friendly isn’t even the whole episode. After the Anglerfish dance (which indeed looked just as horrible as the girls insisted), they simply enjoy the town that graciously and eagerly hosted their battle. And then they bump into Hana’s mother, and we learn that even in this world that deems tankery the most feminine thing you can do, there are some who harbor the opposite opinion. Hana’s is a family of flower arrangers, and it’s shocking how swiftly her quick-to-faint mother freakin’ disowns her when she refuses to give up tankery. Miho simply allowed herself to get mixed into something she was already very well versed in, but Hana has forsaken her family calling and dived into the glory of tankery head first. That makes her pretty cool.


Rating: 7 (Very Good)

Tank Cameo: The Oorai team’s next opponent, Saunders, is from America. They appropriately ride in M4 Shermanslots of them – to the playing of The Battle Hymn of the Republic.

Tonari no Kaibutsu-kun – 05

Yuzan asks Shizuku for an audience, and Shizuku agrees, curious about Haru. He tells her how Haru was kicked out of the house three years ago and went to live with Mitsuyoshi (where he studied in his spare time). Haru and Yuzan’s father wants him to return home so he can send Haru to a “school he can influence”, but Yuzan personally wants Haru to stay put, and asks Shizuku to make that happen. Haru arrives to “rescue” her, and she makes him hear Yuzan out. He agrees to Yuzan’s plan, but still doesn’t trust him. Shizuku tells Haru not to let her get in the way if he wants to really go home, but he tells her he wants to be with her. Ooshima thanks Haru for saving her and then falls for him right in front of Shizuku.

Shizuku is in love with the Haru she knows, but lurking somewhere out of sight are various jigsaw pieces that make up the complete picture of who he is. Frustrated with not knowing which pieces he’s willing to reveal to her and where he draws the line, she takes the opportunity to learn more when it presents itself in the form of Yuzan. But where Haru conceals those pieces out of worry they’ll threaten his relationship with Shizuku, we’re not sure why Yuzan is hiding things. He relays his father’s desire for Haru to come home, but he doesn’t want him home. He implies “they’ll end up killing each other” if he does and laughs a lot, but the laughing and cheerful small talk about sweets hides his true intentions vis-a-vis Haru. Haru likes directness and honesty, which is one of the reasons he likes Shizuku. Yuzan has neither, and so it’s impossible to trust him.

When he forbids Shizuku from talking to Yuzan again, he’s so caught up in tying her best interests with his that he doesn’t realize he’s giving Shizuku an order he has no authority to give. She stands firm in rejecting that order, and even his “I thought you loved me” card doesn’t sway her. In the end though, they grow closer, once they’re once again honest in what they want: Shizuku will be sad if he goes, and Haru doesn’t want to go home to the “den of evil”. Those positions would seem to align with Yuzan, but who knows. And then there’s a potential new love interest in the bespectacled Ooshima (Hanazawa Kana in Shy Mode), pefectly poised to misinterpret Haru’s general kindness with romantic feelings; the next wrench to be thrown into the gears of Shizuku and Haru’s courtship.


Rating: 8 (Great)

P.S. It’s nominally fun to see the characters playing other roles, but the Edo-period omake “preview” is really neither here nor there.

Introducing RABUJOI Org Charts

While juggling up to a dozen series per season, it can be tricky keeping all the characters’ names straight, and their relationships to one another – particularly early in the season. So this Fall we’ve drawn up some organizational charts that do just that: draw straight lines between characters (or curved, in some cases).

The circles are colored by gender and sized by character importance (main or supporting). The color of the lines determines friend, enemy, family, lover, or all of the above (LOL). Click Here or on the new tab up top to learn more. The charts will evolve as the series progress. Note that these only apply to the animes, not the source material.

Muv-Luv Alternative: Total Eclipse – 17

A flashback documents Cryska’s beginnings in a Soviet research facility, where she first met Inia. Back in the present, Lt. Cui now wants to marry Yuuya, and promises they’ll go on honeymoon if Bao Feng beats the Infinities. Unfortunately for her, they are brushed aside with ease. Yuuya goes to town with Inia and Cryska, who wants answers regarding why they’re exhibiting what seems to be feelings for him. Yui stalks Yuuya as he gives the twins flowers and is confronted by Cui. At the local bar, Yuuya asks Yui to train him in kendo, but Leon interrupts, and a fight ensues that they both vow to finish in Blue Flag.

We’ve seen how test pilots are rewarded for risking their lives in new and untested equipment by being given a lot more perks and living more comfortable lives than front-line soldiers. Those benefits are out in full force this week, as for the duration of Blue Flag, if you’re not competing, the day is yours to do with as you please. That means walking around town, hanging out in parks and bars and generally relaxing and not doing much. We’ve always said this series is best when the shit hits the fan and the characters have their backs to the walls. This episode is decidedly not the series at its best.

Nearly every girl is interested in Yuuya, but go about it in different ways. We have Yui, perhaps the most plausible suitor, devolve into full Jealous Blushing Stalker Maiden Mode, and Cui Yifei in Horny Self-Proclaimed Wife Mode. Inia can’t explain why she likes Yuuya, but Cryska likes him too and he makes her happy with a bouquet – only she’s so underdeveloped in social graces, she doesn’t quite grasp what affection, love, or happiness even are. Then there’s apparently a past between Yuuya and Sharon Imes. But more interesting to us is what happened to make Leon hate Yuuya so much and vice versa. Unfortunately, the episode ended before it could get into that.


Rating: 5 (Average)

Sukitte Ii na yo – 04

Yamato gives Mei a bracelet to match his as a public symbol of their love, and rumors spread about their going out, which reach the promiscuous Hayakawa Kakeru. He meets Yamato and Mei for lunch on Saturday, but Hayakawa suggests Mei go out with more guys, upsetting her, and she leaves. Yamato punches him. Back at school, Hayakawa whines to Aiko, but the conversation turns nasty. Mei overhears and has choice words for Hayakawa, who runs off in a snit. An off-guard Aiko calls her and Yamato a couple of idiots and also walks off. Mei meets Yamato in the courtyard, and when she asks him he admits he slept with Aiko. Mei kisses his bandaged hand.

Mei is in top form this week, amidst a barrage of caustic crap from the unpleasant  self-hating Hayakawa. She doesn’t let herself get fazed by that barrage, and wastes no time disposing of his number in her phone once she sees his true colors. He’s a tomcat and a cad, amassing a legion of FWBs but having no genuine happiness to show for it. He can’t have what she and Yamato have, can’t stand it, and so tries to destroy it. He fails spectacularly. He’s also a coward and a brute, lashing out at Aiko when she gives him her ear, and even grabbing/shoving Mei when she gives him a piece of her mind in Aiko’s defense (Mei’s brave “smacker” comment was pretty freakin’ boss.) Pushing girls around: NOT COOL. Not expecting thanks, Mei makes it clear to Aiko that if it’s a fight she wants, she won’t let her win. Aiko, who fired the first salvo last week, pretends it’s not a big deal…but we know better.

Then we have Yamato himself, the guy Aiko wants and Hayakawa wants to be. He first gets kudos for suggesting that things may get easier for Mei if she made more friends, which is easier to do when she’s with him. It’s a bit heavy-handed, sure, and maybe Yamato and Mei would be just dandy if everyone simply left them the hell alone, but this is high school and that’s not going to happen. Mei could use more allies. Yamato has some points deduced for agreeing to yet another date that’s not just the two of them, and for again leaving her alone with a wolf. Like last week, he comes out on top by promptly detecting Hayakawa’s knavery, slugging him, and making it clear Mei is his (a bit possessive, but his heart’s in the right place). One concern is the “Nagi” who calls him. By episode’s end he tells Mei the truth about him and Aiko. Here’s hoping he continues telling her the truth – it’s the best aphrodisiac.


Rating: 9 (Superior)

P.S. Yamato’s a great deal taller than Mei – we were curious just how much taller. If Mei is a pretty average 153cm tall (5′), that makes Yamato 187cm (6’2″). Mei’s in for a lot of neck-craning. The image to the left is to scale (1px=1cm).

Sword Art Online – 17

Kirito saves Lyfa from the Salamanders, and she thanks him by teaching him how to fly and buying him a drink. He tells her it’s imperative he get to the World Tree as soon as possible. She grudgingly agrees to accompany him before she logs out and is revealed to be Sugu. Kirito promises Yui he’ll get Asuna back, then falls asleep and logs out as well. Up in the World Tree, Asuna is being held captive by Sugou, AKA the Fairy King Oberon, who calls her Queen Titania. He insists she fall in love with him soon. He also tells her about using 300 SAO players including her and the 10,000 AFO users for secret research into implanting artificial thoughts, emotions and memories.

We can say with confidence if we met someone speaking in the same voice as our little sister, even if she looked totally different, we’d ask if she was our little sister in real life…but that’s just us. As for Sugu, we were expecting her to run over to her brother in the next room, but while Kirito seemed to give her a similar vibe, it seems she hasn’t made the connection yet. So we have a brother and a sister (really cousin!) who likes him, oblivious to who the other one really is, headed to the World Tree to try to climb it – something that hasn’t been done before. There’s a good reason for that: the conditions for clearing the game may not be possible. Only one race can win, but the final quest may require cooperation between races, which will probably never happen considering one would be sacrificial.

Also, no one knows the nature of the quest itself, and there’s a good reason for that too: Sugou Nobuyuki, AKA “Fairy King Oberon”, is using the players of ALfeim Online for clandestine human experimentation, and it behooves him to delay the clearing of the game. Sugou cements his place as the slimiest, Evilest Evil-With-A-Capital-E Bad Guy of the series, who wants Asuna whether she wants him or not. Asuna puts up a brave front, but her horror is palpable as he paws her and explains exactly how he could wipe her memories (including those of Kirito, no doubt), her free will, her personality – everything that makes her Yuuki Asuna, if he displeases him. So she has to sit tight, and hope that zany brother-sister duo finds a way to get to her. Judging by how quickly Kirito learned high-speed flying (an awesome scene, BTW), it may not take long.


Rating: 8 (Great)

From the New World (Shin Sekai yori) – 05

Rijin is killed fighting the blowdog, and the queerat horde returns. Without Cantus, the kids are powerless, and must flee. Saki trips and falls down a hill, and is found by Satoru, but they’re captured by the queerats. In their tree prison they start to vent their stress an anxiety with intimate behavior, but the guard is watching. Satoru gives it a haythatcher egg, which it eats and is killed. They excape, and are led into a rival queerat colony by a talking queerat named Squealer. He begs the two “gods” to help them against the invading queerats, who attack the colony that night. Satoru and Saki use the confusion to escape, and Satoru ignites poison gas to take out their pursuers. Satoru pokes a hole in the liquid-like ceiling of the cave, which collapses on them.

When Saki and Satoru are taken prisoner by the roving queerats, they find themselves up a tree in very close quarters, and they start to feel very…amarous. They’ve been friends for a long time and both probably find each other attractive, but that isn’t all that’s going on. In a very carefully-animated scene, Saki realizes as she’s with Satoru that she’s doing exactly what the library slug said she’d do if faced with undue stress and anxiety: engage in intimate sexual behavior, like bonobos. She’s doing what her genetic makeup programmed her to do, not what she wants to do. She stops herself.

Before she learned about humanity’s bloody history and the nature of the society she lives in, Saki was into Shun, not Satoru. If she’s going to be intimate, it’ll be with someone she truly likes like him, not whoever happens to be nearby in order to blow off steam. Her mind fights her body. But this is just the first of many situations she and Satoru face this week that puts them into survival mode. She also learns that humans and kids in particular should steer clear of queerats, because they’ll be exhalted as gods and brought into their wars – and war is something most humans can no longer physically wage.


Rating: 9 (Superior)

P.S. Saki’s adventure garb is really cool-looking, giving off some serious Nausicaä vibes.

Btooom! – 04

Kira Kousuke, who murdered then raped three women, is deposited on the island with his lawyer Soichi and his father. When his father goes into an abusive range, Kousuke snaps and plants an implosion bomb on him, killing him. Soichi runs off, but Sakamoto and Taira bump into Kousuke, still standing over the corpse. They run too, but Taira sprains his ankle. Sakamoto draws him away and learns that Kousuke is an experienced Btooom! player, but not as good as him. When a bomb blast makes him concuss his head against a rock, Sakamoto forgets he’s in the real world, and nearly kills Kousuke before snapping out of it. Instead he ties him up and leaves him a candy bar, taking his bombs and supplies.

We consider ourselves lucky and blessed that we had good parents who not only taught us about right and wrong, but were also loving and caring, and didn’t use us as mini punching bags. Kira Kousuke wasn’t so lucky: his dad is human garbage. Well, was. While it isn’t solely his dad’s fault his son ended up a homicidal psychopath – genetics and neuroscience also played important roles – Pop certainly didn’t help matters with his parenting style of “when in doubt, crush your kid’s junk”. Some people back home were clearly so disgusted with him, his rotten son, and the snivelling lawyer, they voted to send the lot of them to the island to kill each other. This drives home the point that everyone on the island were extremely loathed by some of all of their peers.

Voting for someone to die is a lot different from pulling the trigger, especially if you assume the voting is just a game.  Himiko’s crime was abandoning her friends to a gang of rapists – which isn’t technically a crime, but definitely earned her loathing; while Kousuke did terrible awful things, but did them because he is quite literally a psychopath. Who knows why Taira was chosen, but the reasons are as diverse as the people, so for all we know one of his coworkers didn’t like how he finished the coffee without making more. Maybe that video game company got sick of Sakamoto’s applications and had him shipped off. Lastly, we’re curious about Sakamoto’s “trance” in which he acted like everything was a game, much like Kousuke. Was this incident unique to his head injury? Will it happen again, causing him to kill?


Rating: 6 (Good)

Car Cameo: In the cold open we see Japan’s favorite squad car, the Toyota Crown GRS180.

K – 04

Shiro’s friend Mishima forwards him the video of his alleged crime, which took place December 7th at 23:45. With Kuroh short on patience, Shiro attempts to scrape together an alibi, first by asking Kukuri, who was confessed to by Mishima from the clock tower; the student council, which was engaged in operations; and the newspaper club, which took pictures but none of him. At the faculty lounge Shiro secures gate records that indicate he never left the island, but Kukuri mentions he often sneaks out, avoiding such systems.

Kuroh is about to kill him, but the sight of him shielding Neko stays his hand once more, as does Kukuri remembering Shiro was with her less than an hour after the crime, satisfying Kuroh. Shiro goes home, finds bloody clothes in his closet, and has flashes of the murder of Totsuka Tatara he may have committed after all. Yata and Kumamoto pay a visit to Shiro’s school, while SCEPTER 4 has also gotten a fix on him.

Having someone try to kill you every day is exhausting.

When he delivers lines like this, there’s something so wholesome and aw-shucks pure about Shiro that you want to believe he’s innocent of killing Totsuka Tatara and becoming the most wanted man in Tokyo. He also isn’t about to let Neko die protecting him, and stands in front of her in a gesture of honor that just happens to move Kuroh. This whole episode Shiro is desperately struggling to find an alibi, because he too cannot believe he did the deed – only to have the evidence stare him in the face in the end.

Could it have been planted? Certainly. Those garbage robots can certainly be programmed to collect as well as deposit anything. And there’s something fishy about Shiro’s flashback being just the video footage from Tatara’s point of view. Shouldn’t he be remembering what happened from his own perspective? This episode stuck with the Othello Duo (Shiro & Kuro), Neko and Kukuri, and did a bang-up job telling a twisting and undulating story and keeping things moving. But the other factions outside the island are primed to strike. Kuroh may have been appeased, he’s just the first of many deadly hurdles.


Rating: 7 (Very Good)

Zetsuen no Tempest – 04

Mahiro and Yoshino take a bus to the countryside where a Fruit emerges from a mountaintop. Yoshino tries to save an elderly couple and a pair of boys, but they succomb to Black Iron Syndrome along with every living thing in the area. Mahiro breaks into a house and takes a bath. Yoshino cooks dinner while talking to Hakaze about how he met Mahiro – and how he was essentially forced into being his friend, and eventually went along with it. Hakaze also asks Mahiro, who concludes he probably wouldn’t still be around if he’d never met Yoshino.

After lots of action, this episode slows things down and offers up some character building, and it was still great. Yoshino and Mahiro are safe for the moment, but are still living day to day, so there’s not much to do except maintain. Meanwhile, Hakaze, ten time zones away, has little to do on her deserted island. She has time for those stories people deem too long to tell, and Yoshino is happy to let loose. Mahiro was a spoiled, privileged little brat, you see, who one day got hit by a motorcycle while walking home. He just happened to survive, and Mahiro just happened to be chosen to visit him in the hospital, against his will. He’s ultimately dubbed “Mahiro’s Guardian” (complete with name tag), and he runs with it.

But just like the grown-up version, this young Yoshino did his duty without complaint (well, with few complaints), even investigating the accident when Mahiro asks him to (not confident adults would listen) and concluding a disgruntled former employee of his father’s ordered the hit and tried to make it look like an accident. Then as now, Mahiro did what he wanted, because he could, while Yoshino did what he was told, but did it his way. We like how Hakaze gets both sides of the story, but Mahiro’s is so much more succinct – after all, he’s more interested in a future in which he gets revenge than he is in the past that got him to this point. Mahiro, on the other hand, still sees Aika when he closes his eyes.


Rating: 8 (Great)