Hyouka – 21

A year ago, Fukube rejects Mayaka’s Valentine’s Day chocolate; she vows to present him with homemade chocolate from scratch next year. That day approaches, and after help from Chitanda, she leaves the masterpiece in the club room for Fukube. Chitanda enters and is shocked to find it’s been stolen. Oreki agrees to help investigate, but they’re too late, as Mayaka shows up before it can be found. She goes home without a fuss. On their walk home, Oreki confirms Fukube himself stole the chocolate, because he wasn’t ready to give Mayaka an answer. Mayaka knew he stole it too, surprising Chitanda. That night, Fukube gives Mayaka a call.

Fukube Satoshi has always irritated us a bit. He’s just so…insufferable at times. But apparently even something as recent as his “defeat” at the hands of Oreki in the Juumoji case has humbled him. As Oreki notes while he’s playing an arcade game they used to play in middle school, Fukube used to be obsessed with winning, and pissed off when he didn’t. But then one day, he realized winning wouldn’t fulfill him. So he decided to become obsessed with not being obsessed with things. To be simplistic, he went Zen. Which is why sometimes earthly occurances – like a girl in love with him demanding his answer, or his scheme to sidestep the issue hurting another girl – no longer immediately occur to him.

He’s gone so inward, the effects of his actions on those around him, while not lost on him, are allowed to unfold without his intervention. But he knows he’s in a comfort bubble; one he’s afraid to leave. Even if he won’t admit it, his friendship and interactions with Mayaka led him to win her heart, whether he intended it or not. Now that he’s won something, he struggles to take the next step, because it could lead to pain; not now, but somewhere down the road. Oreki doesn’t offer him any sage advice (he has his own struggles with whatever he and Chitanda have), but we know part of him wants Satoshi to take a leap of faith, just like we know part of him wants to punch Oreki – hard – twice – for what he did to Mayaka and Chitanda. We’re not sure Fukube deserves Mayaka, but it sounds like he loves her too, so giving her a straight answer would go a long way towards redeeming himself.


Rating: 9 (Superior)

Car Cameos: On the bridge where they meet, several cars we’ve already seen in past episodes drive by Mayaka and Chitanda: a Mitsubishi i, Toyota Ractis, Honda ACTY Van, Toyota Sienta, Toyota Comfort, Suzuki Alto Lapin, Mitsubishi Colt, and Honda Civic.

P.S. Chitanda’s excuse for not giving Oreki chocolates – that “her family doesn’t give gifts to those she’s truly close to – that was an adorable exchange…par for the course where Chii-chan is concerned.

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Puella Magi Madoka Magica – 09 (Retro Review)


Originally posted 4 March 2011 – Yikes, yet another one bites the dust, in short order. I’m tellin’ ya, this series has guts. It’s taking us to a very dark place. Sakura gets axed this week, fighing off the witch Sayaka has transformed into. Homura is now the only maho shojo that currently stands between the looming mayhem of Walpurgis and the city. This puts Madoka in a spot, and Kyuubey is going to exploit it.

Kyuubey also lets loose a little bit about what he is and why he does what he does. He and his ilk are after energy. The best way to get it is to contract with girls of a certain age, turn them into maho shojo, and then wait until they ‘mature’ into witches through the corruption of their soul gems into grief seeds. This means that all witches were probably human girls at some point, tricked into contracting and downloading their souls into gems by Kyuubey-types, though they don’t (and can’t) see it as “tricking”.

That would require an emotional position on the matter of turning girls, and Kyuubey, you see, lacks the capacity for emotion of any kind. As such we can’t necessarily label him as evil; he’s no different from a lion on the Savannah. It may seem cruel how they’ll pick off weak or tired prey, but that’s how a predator survives: by exploiting any and every advantage nature throws at it in order to acquire fuel to keep living. In this case, human girls are the prey, or rather a resource, that Kyuubey coldly, logically coerces into essentially destroying themselves.

This is why Homura, from episode one, has been so determined not to let Madoka contract with Kyuubey. Not because she doesn’t want strong competition; it’s because she doesn’t want her to end up like Mimi, Sayaka, Sakura, countless other girls…or herself. At this point, we really don’t want Madoka to contract either, and are glad she’s held out long enough to learn the truth. Why should she throw her relatively blessed, happy life, humanity, and soul away…just to become Kyuubey’s dinner?

Still, there’s no reason to doubt Kyuubey’s assertion that Madoka would be the most powerful Maho Shojo if she contracted. That could mean she’d ultimately become the most powerful witch…and later, a great feast for Kyuubey. Will Homura be enough to fend off Walpurgis on her own? We’ll see. Meanwhile, we predict it will be most difficult for future 2011 series top the consistent excellence of Puella Magi.


Rating: 9 (Superior)