Kamisama Dolls 8

I thought this would be a lighthearted filler episode after such a heavy and emotional flashback last week, but not only did it buck the “beach episode” trend (with a typhoon), it also managed to move the story forward while subtly developing the characters. It also had some great kakashi hero moments and kakashi-on-kakashi combat.

Kyohei, Utao and Hibino are back in Tokyo after Kukuri was fixed, and while dropping off some books at the library, Hibino bumps into Aki (I suppose he never imagined anyone would look for him there?). In any case, he puts a blade to Hibino’s throat and threatens her. It’s a great scene because now that HIbino knows his story, he isn’t just some mindless wack-job; she knows now he has reason to be…the way he is. He just wants him to deal with the village, and leave Kyohei and Utao out of it. He’s not going to do that.

Kyohei told her he quit being a seki because he feared the evil inside Aki could be in him too. A kakashi is a thing of great power, which, you know, corrupts. Aki believes the darkness its within Kyohei, seki or not. He also gives Utao a spook, telling her kakashi aren’t good for anything but death and destruction. Having seen the collateral damage they can cause, suffice it to say they shouldn’t be in the wrong hands.

Back to Hibino, with all this crap going on, one almost forgets she’s just an ordinary college student, and the stress she’s had to deal with is starting to show, especially when she arrives home after the duel between Aki and Utao basically about to lose it. Her father left that infernal village to spare his daughter this nonsense, but as he notes, the village has a way of staying with you.


Rating: 3.5

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Ikoku Meiro no Croisée 8

Yune and Claude stop by the Blanche residence, and Alice takes Yune by the hand and wisks her off. If it was ever in doubt, this episode confirmed that she sees Yune not so much as a human friend, but as a doll-like ideal of a childhood dream she had. It’s pretty odd that this girl made up a story about meeting a Japanese girl, then meeting her by chance years later. Is she an oracle?

In all seriousness though, while she and Yune chatter away about folk tales and rice balls, Claude is just standing around waiting, when he’s cornered by Camille. From a flashback and her general behavior around him, she had an unrequited love for him. The cold way they interact here confirms that they share some complex feelings, not all good. Camille resents her role as a family bargaining chip – she won’t be marrying for love – but she’s resigned to that life.


Rating: 3.5

Summer 2011 OPs and EDs

We’re not even going to bother posting videos of these anymore, since most of not all won’t be working links in a few days time due to YouTube policies. Stills will have to do. And suffice it to say, you’ve probably seen/heard these openings and endings before…otherwise, go check ’em out; we deem them the best of the Summer.

Best Opening: Mawaru Penguindrum. A no-brainer. Like the series itself, it’s slick, smooth, full of color and motion. The theme, “Nornir” by Etsuko Yakushimaru Metropolitan Orchestra, is catchy and serious with just a tinge of cuteness to compliment the presence of the cartoon penguins.

Runner-up: Dantalian no Shoka. “Cras numquam scire” by Yucca is soulful and melancholy with just a hint of hope mixed in. The visuals, like the backgrounds and settings of the series, are richly textured and lush.

Honorable Mentions: Blood-C and Kamisama Dolls. Blood-C benefits from its kinetic ballad-like theme, “Spiral” by DUSTZ, whose lyrics span three languages without sounding too silly. The visuals are unambiguous in laying out the content of the show: namely Saya kickin’ ass. Kamisama Dolls’ latinesque theme – “Fukanzen Nunshō” by Chiaki Ishikawa – is the openings pièce de résistance. The multilayered shapes moving over characters, changing their colors, is also a nice touch.

Best Ending: Mawaru Penguindrum. “DEAR FUTURE” by coaltar of the deepers is full of pent-up energy and longing being belted out with lots of fancy melodies. The Himari triplet imagery doesn’t make much sense, but its cool anyway. A good way to end each (so far) excellent episode.

Runner-up: Ao no Exorcist. A series of cubes jumping up and down to the pumping electropop beat of “Wired Life” by Meisa Kuroki prefaces a stylish, elegant ending sequence. It’s a simple but well-executed concept using pans and conceals of characters.

Honorable Mention: Kamisama Dolls. More Chiaki Ishikawa’s amazing voice, now in a more spacey, sci-fi style than the latin opening. I particularly like the very end, which pulls out of a shot of the core characters to an almost U2-like 12-string closing chord.