Deadman Wonderland 8

Thanks to Shiro, who seems to be back to normal (for now, of course), Ganta, Nagi and Koshio are saved when she drops in and destroys Genkaku’s guitar gun. We then see that Scar Chain is actually quite a large group of resistance fighters. We also learn that the crazyass priest is a former inmate and now part of Tamaki’s corps of anti-deadmen enforcers, or “undertakers”, who can counter branches of sin. So if there’s a war in Wonderland, Makina’s guards aren’t the only thing standing between Scar Chain and their freedom.

And there will be a war. It’s inspection week, which means all of Wonderland’s sadistic games are shut down and the prison is made to look normal and sqeaky-clean. Nagi doesn’t want revenge or to escape as much as he wants the prison’s secrets exposed to the world, where presumably the public will call for its termination. It won’t be easy though, with Tamaki and the undertakers on the prowl. It would seem, however, that Captain Makina shares this goal, if for different reasons. She doesn’t seem aware of Scar Chain’s plan, but I wonder if she’d let them proceed just because she’s sick of Tamaki.

Which brings us to Rokuro, a Scar Chain member who seems to be a double agent. He is in league with the undertakers, and I have no reason to believe he won’t betray his comrades – and Ganta, for whom he has no love – right when victory is in grasp. That’s just how this show has gone down so far. Even if Rokuro turns out to be good, Ganta still doesn’t know Shiro’s true deal. Lot on his plate, this kid. Rating: 3.5

AnoHana 8

Everyone feels their share of guilt over Menma’s death, from the surviving Peace Busters to her mother. It seemed, in the beginning, that all her friends had gotten over her and moved on except Jinta. But one by one, we learn that everyone has unresolved guilt and pain within them; Jinta, being haunted by Menma, brought them back together and brought those emotions back to the surface. So the question now is, what to do with them?

Anjou is distressed by how hard Jinta is working, or punishing himself, for Menma’s sake. She also confesses to him that she was glad and relieved when he said he didn’t like Menma way back then at the secret base, and never got over her guilt for feeling that. She lays it all out for Jinta, but all he can do is walk away; no matter what anyone says, he can’t forget about someone who he can still see, hear, and touch. You can’t help but feel bad for Anjou either, though.

When everyone visits Menma’s mother, she accuses them of only wanting to have fun, and curses them for being allowed to grow up and live out their lives while Menma can’t. She’s haunted by her daughter’s memory, but not her person, so she has even fewer answers – and hence more despair – than anyone else. It outlines the “competition” (for lack of a better word) between Menma’s friends’ pain and that of the woman who gave birth to her. She may see exuberance and life in Menma’s grown friends, but she doesn’t know what we know about what they feel beneath their exteriors.

When Jinta goes to apologize to Anjou, everyone else is there, and a sort of invervention occurs, with only Poppo on his side. Just as Yukiatsu is about to slug him, Menma makes her presence known to everyone for the first time by writing in her diary and dropping it. This is a huge development, though it may not assuage the skeptics among Jinta’s friends. But it’s clear one thing Menma wishes above all is for everyone to be friends and not fight.

One other character I’ve neglected until now is the force of Jinta’s dad: this guy lost his beautiful wife, but he carries on, in a way Jinta hasn’t figured out how to do. He’s also the best kind of dad; one who isn’t as concerned with his son following the rules as much as following his heart and his own path in life. Rating: 4