Tiger & Bunny 5

This week wasn’t Tiger & Bunny’s finest, but some nice characterization helped to cut through an otherwise unexceptional outing, event-wise. The thief with the diamond body was just ridiculous. But Kotetsu and Barnaby continue to have good chemistry despite their many differences of opinion, and the colorful group of heroes is always interesting.

Barnaby himself is an odd guy. He has an enormous room with nothing in it but a chair and an enormous tv, kinda like those a supervillain would use. So who does he call on the big video phone to craft some devious scheme while all the lights are out? Well, no one, actually; his longtime family maid calls him, asking if he recieved his annual birthday cake from her. Barnaby’s character design screams bad guy, but he isn’t one.

Kotetsu, meanwhile, is his usual charming, bumbling, well-meaning oaf-like guy with a heart of gold who does everything with the best of intentions but often causes a lot of collateral damage. The whole birthday surprise plot was pretty silly though, it made the whole group of heros look more than a little hokey. Seriously, aren’t there people they can pay to make an awesome birthday for Barnaby? Like, planners or something? Rating: 3

Advertisements

Hanasaku Iroha 5

It’s all that damn erotica authors fault…

Ah, a misunderstanding episode. While this series has definitely slowed down since the first two eps, it remains one of my favorites this spring. For some reason, this episode reminded me of an episode of Frasier, one in which a little misunderstanding is blown way out of proportion and everyone emotionally commits to an assumption that turns out to be false. Yeah, a lot of Fraiser episodes (and those of many many other shows) are like that, but for some reason Frasier came to mind first. Dunno why.

At any rate, Ohana is, as always, trying to get into Minko’s good graces, this time by going after Tohru, who the author deduces has defected to rival Fukuya. Combined with Minko and Ohana seeing the Fukuya heiress on a motorbike with him, Minko is devastated. She isn’t kidding anyone with her tough, dealing-with-it face, including Ohana. Of couse, as it turns out, Tohru only filled in for one night at Fukuya, and far from dating Fukuya, she just wanted a ride.

It’s a well-written and acted episode to me, because all of the factual omissions that lead to the understanding are very organic and fit nicely with the individual characters involved: the author’s tendency to jump to conclusions, Minko’s infatuation with Tohru, and Ren’s tight-lippedness. All of the facts they have seem to point to him leaving, and they have no reason to question for how long he’ll be gone, or whether he’ll come back. Those who know what’s really going on stay quiet too, because they have better things to do. While I knew the twist was coming from a mile away, it was still well-played and an entertaining watch. Rating: 3.5

The World God Only Knows II 4

The Haqua mini-arc reaches a somewhat underwhelming conclusion, for no other reason than Haqua herself didn’t turn out to be that interesting after all, and the big bad was essentially a giant cotton ball, with strings connecting it to more than a dozen (the number kept changing) troubled students. The whole practical procedure for capturing loose souls is also a little hokey, what with the giant glass jar. How hard could it be to hold onto a jar and tug when it starts sucking the soul in?

Yet apparently Haqua, who studied hard and tested well in school, isn’t up to this task, which is why the soul has gotten so much bigger. Also, while usually Keima had to win the hearts of the loose soul-infected girls, not only are none of the students individually addressed here, but Keima has absolutely nothing to do (they even cut to him a couple times so he can say this). When Haqua herself allowed the loose soul to possess her, it’s up to Elcie, not Keima, to cheer her up and snap her out of it. While Elcie told Haqua what she needed to hear, it’s kind of silly how easily he released her, considering the extent of the loose soul’s power and the depth of Haqua’s angst.

I’d like to think Haqua has grown here, but if she returns, I’m sure she’ll still have a smug, superior attitude towards Keima and Elcie, despite evidence to the contrary at the end, when Keima thanks them and admits she misjudged them. After all, that is her character: she’s the high-and-mighty section cheif, while Elcie was just her school acolyte, and Keima is a useless human. But if she is a little more humble, I’ll be surprised. Next week, I hope Keima has something to say or do. Rating: 2.5